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Lee returns to the old neighborhood, with cast members, new friends, and Beats.
Do The Right Thing is 25 years old now. This past week’s events in Ferguson, Missouri have made clear that the film’s depiction of racial tensions in America are still relevant (and Public Enemy’s “Fight The Power” still sounds as good as ever)—but Spike Lee’s depiction of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn doesn’t necessarily resemble the Brooklyn and Bed-Stuy of 2014.
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Lee returns to the old neighborhood, with cast members, new friends, and Beats.

Do The Right Thing is 25 years old now. This past week’s events in Ferguson, Missouri have made clear that the film’s depiction of racial tensions in America are still relevant (and Public Enemy’s “Fight The Power” still sounds as good as ever)—but Spike Lee’s depiction of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn doesn’t necessarily resemble the Brooklyn and Bed-Stuy of 2014.

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You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."
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You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

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"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>

Brian Knappenberger talks about his new film, the life and legacy of Aaron Swartz, and the troubling trends that survive the Internet activist.

The Internet’s Own Boy details how F.B.I. and Secret Service agents went after members of Swartz’s inner circle. Knappenberger says, “They told Aaron’s father they wanted to make an example out of him, but an example of what? What kind of behavior were they trying to deter? The majority of Aaron’s activity was about social organizing and getting people involved in their government. The notion that Aaron was some sort of quasi-celebrity hacker who needed to be made an example of is absurd and unsophisticated.”

Read More>

Brian Knappenberger talks about his new film, the life and legacy of Aaron Swartz, and the troubling trends that survive the Internet activist.

The Internet’s Own Boy details how F.B.I. and Secret Service agents went after members of Swartz’s inner circle. Knappenberger says, “They told Aaron’s father they wanted to make an example out of him, but an example of what? What kind of behavior were they trying to deter? The majority of Aaron’s activity was about social organizing and getting people involved in their government. The notion that Aaron was some sort of quasi-celebrity hacker who needed to be made an example of is absurd and unsophisticated.”

Read More>

Tutus, Sparkly Nail Polish, And Half-Pipes: These 6-Year-Olds Will Make You Want To Raise Skateboarding Girls

The three 6-year-old girls who make up the Pink Helmet Posse, profiled by The New York Times, in a short Op-Doc, are equal parts adorable and badass. The film opens with the three friends, Relz, Bella, and Sierra, painting their nails in the middle of a skate park. Next, we see them dropping into a half-pipe and maneuvering around a pile of leaves. The rest of the film follows the insanely talented crew as they practice tricks, fall on their faces, and get scared of bees.

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