FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Brian Knappenberger talks about his new film, the life and legacy of Aaron Swartz, and the troubling trends that survive the Internet activist.

The Internet’s Own Boy details how F.B.I. and Secret Service agents went after members of Swartz’s inner circle. Knappenberger says, “They told Aaron’s father they wanted to make an example out of him, but an example of what? What kind of behavior were they trying to deter? The majority of Aaron’s activity was about social organizing and getting people involved in their government. The notion that Aaron was some sort of quasi-celebrity hacker who needed to be made an example of is absurd and unsophisticated.”

Read More>

Brian Knappenberger talks about his new film, the life and legacy of Aaron Swartz, and the troubling trends that survive the Internet activist.

The Internet’s Own Boy details how F.B.I. and Secret Service agents went after members of Swartz’s inner circle. Knappenberger says, “They told Aaron’s father they wanted to make an example out of him, but an example of what? What kind of behavior were they trying to deter? The majority of Aaron’s activity was about social organizing and getting people involved in their government. The notion that Aaron was some sort of quasi-celebrity hacker who needed to be made an example of is absurd and unsophisticated.”

Read More>

Tutus, Sparkly Nail Polish, And Half-Pipes: These 6-Year-Olds Will Make You Want To Raise Skateboarding Girls

The three 6-year-old girls who make up the Pink Helmet Posse, profiled by The New York Times, in a short Op-Doc, are equal parts adorable and badass. The film opens with the three friends, Relz, Bella, and Sierra, painting their nails in the middle of a skate park. Next, we see them dropping into a half-pipe and maneuvering around a pile of leaves. The rest of the film follows the insanely talented crew as they practice tricks, fall on their faces, and get scared of bees.

Read More>

This week, the home page of the NYTimes.com featured an unusual, wonderful Op-Doc called “A Short History of the Highrise.” Billed as an “interactive documentary,” the project was a collaboration between the Times and the National Film Board of Canada.

With influences ranging from traditional documentary to video games to the tablet experience, “A Short History of the Highrise” is a digital publishing rabbit hole. A casual viewer can consume the film in a few minutes, while the obsessive can delve deep into supplemental content for hours. Fast Company caught up with the project’s Emmy Award-winning director, Katerina Cizek, to learn more about how the documentary form is being transformed in a digital age.