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Here’s what automakers can do when cars have built-in smartphone capabilities.
It’s no secret that cars are trying to replicate the smartphone experience. Touchscreen interfaces are common in today’s cars, dashboard designers take UI tips from iPhones, and automakers want to build apps for cars. And starting this year, large automakers like General Motors are taking the next obvious step and integrating 4G LTE service into their cars. Drivers pay a monthly service fee for in-car 4G that’s separate from their smartphones, and use it for an array of services from movies for kids in the backseat to sophisticated GPS-on-steroids solutions. It’s a win-win for automakers, the dealers who sell the 4G add-ons, and carriers like AT&T. But is it a win for consumers?
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Here’s what automakers can do when cars have built-in smartphone capabilities.

It’s no secret that cars are trying to replicate the smartphone experience. Touchscreen interfaces are common in today’s cars, dashboard designers take UI tips from iPhones, and automakers want to build apps for cars. And starting this year, large automakers like General Motors are taking the next obvious step and integrating 4G LTE service into their cars. Drivers pay a monthly service fee for in-car 4G that’s separate from their smartphones, and use it for an array of services from movies for kids in the backseat to sophisticated GPS-on-steroids solutions. It’s a win-win for automakers, the dealers who sell the 4G add-ons, and carriers like AT&T. But is it a win for consumers?

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The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.
Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.
Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.
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The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.

Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.

Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.

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If existing fitness bands are designed like overzealous kindergarten teachers, then the Pavlok is a drill sergeant. The band—$150 on preorder today—will quite literally shock you to wake up on time or exercise when you should.
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If existing fitness bands are designed like overzealous kindergarten teachers, then the Pavlok is a drill sergeant. The band—$150 on preorder today—will quite literally shock you to wake up on time or exercise when you should.

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TerraMax kits turn ordinary military trucks into self-driving road warriors.
When you think of self-driving vehicles, you probably think of Google, Audi, and Daimler. Although the research underlying all of their advances was funded by DARPA, it’s somewhat surprising that the military isn’t already way ahead of everyone else when it comes to remote-controlled ground movement.
Oshkosh Defense is hoping to change that. 
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TerraMax kits turn ordinary military trucks into self-driving road warriors.

When you think of self-driving vehicles, you probably think of Google, Audi, and Daimler. Although the research underlying all of their advances was funded by DARPA, it’s somewhat surprising that the military isn’t already way ahead of everyone else when it comes to remote-controlled ground movement.

Oshkosh Defense is hoping to change that. 

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The Bike Fits In A Backpack, So It’s Super Easy To Bring On Trips (Some Assembly Required)

If you’ve ever brought a bike along on a flight or packed up the parts to ship across the country, you know that trying to move a bike around is expensive. It also tends to slightly offset some of the environmental benefits of riding, since a box holding a bulky frame takes up a lot of space on a delivery truck. That’s why this new design concept shrinks down a bike so it fits in a backpack.

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For 82 years, Disney’s in-studio life drawing classes have helped evolve its animated characters. But as increasing reliance on computers lures young animators away from classical drawing, three of Disney’s current master teachers are reminding them why figure drawing is still crucial.
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For 82 years, Disney’s in-studio life drawing classes have helped evolve its animated characters. But as increasing reliance on computers lures young animators away from classical drawing, three of Disney’s current master teachers are reminding them why figure drawing is still crucial.

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fastcodesign:

Invisible losers, VR police states: “A History of the Future in 100 Objects” gets right what most futurist concepts get wrong.

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fastcodesign:

Invisible losers, VR police states: “A History of the Future in 100 Objects” gets right what most futurist concepts get wrong.

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Last year we reported on the first machines going into The UPS Stores. How’s it going?
Almost a year ago, The UPS Store in San Diego was the first to launch retail 3-D printing, available to anyone. The experiment was targeted at small businesses and startups giving them access to a 3-D designer and printer in part to assist in building their products. But how did it work out?
The good news is that putting a 3-D printer in a retail store, right next to the regular one-dimensional copy machines, actually works. As such, the company will be announcing expansion plans in the fall to put more 3-D printers in stores across the country. Its expectation that the technology wasn’t just a fad is proving true, but it’s also learned a few lessons over the last year.
Read More>

Last year we reported on the first machines going into The UPS Stores. How’s it going?

Almost a year ago, The UPS Store in San Diego was the first to launch retail 3-D printing, available to anyone. The experiment was targeted at small businesses and startups giving them access to a 3-D designer and printer in part to assist in building their products. But how did it work out?

The good news is that putting a 3-D printer in a retail store, right next to the regular one-dimensional copy machines, actually works. As such, the company will be announcing expansion plans in the fall to put more 3-D printers in stores across the country. Its expectation that the technology wasn’t just a fad is proving true, but it’s also learned a few lessons over the last year.

Read More>