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Handsome Paper Notebooks Come With Digital Backup
Paper is awesome. So is digital. We shouldn’t have to choose between them in a zero-sum game, right? That’s why the popular sketching app Paper now lets you output your digital drawings into physical books. Now a brand called Mod is offering the same product in reverse: handsome physical notebooks that “sync” to a digital app and web service. All hail the flip-flop!

fastcodesign:

Handsome Paper Notebooks Come With Digital Backup

Paper is awesome. So is digital. We shouldn’t have to choose between them in a zero-sum game, right? That’s why the popular sketching app Paper now lets you output your digital drawings into physical books. Now a brand called Mod is offering the same product in reverse: handsome physical notebooks that “sync” to a digital app and web service. All hail the flip-flop!

Game of Thrones costume designer Michele Clapton stitches symbolism into the show’s dark characters. “It’s so easy to draw a pretty dress in a fun way,” Clapton tells Fast Company. “But this is so much more about finding the right look and telling so much more about that character, and that’s what I really, really enjoy: the storytelling.” More>

Game of Thrones costume designer Michele Clapton stitches symbolism into the show’s dark characters. “It’s so easy to draw a pretty dress in a fun way,” Clapton tells Fast Company. “But this is so much more about finding the right look and telling so much more about that character, and that’s what I really, really enjoy: the storytelling.” More>

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A Look Inside Interior Designer Charlie Ferrer’s Showroom Apartment

When Charlie Ferrer moved into his prewar, 1,000-square-foot Manhattan apartment in 2013, he was not only establishing his first residence in the city after half a dozen years in Los Angeles. He was also launching his solo venture as an interior designer and furniture dealer—using his apartment as a quasi-showroom for custom-made pieces from a growing stable of designers.

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Apple’s “Transparent Texting” Could Make Typing And Walking Safer
If you’re walking, you really shouldn’t be texting. While not as perilous as texting and driving, there’s no surer way to annoy fellow pedestrians than by zigzagging across a sidewalk, eyes glued to your precious screen. But if you absolutely must walk and text, Apple might have a new feature that could make that action safer.
More> Co.Design

fastcodesign:

Apple’s “Transparent Texting” Could Make Typing And Walking Safer

If you’re walking, you really shouldn’t be texting. While not as perilous as texting and driving, there’s no surer way to annoy fellow pedestrians than by zigzagging across a sidewalk, eyes glued to your precious screen. But if you absolutely must walk and text, Apple might have a new feature that could make that action safer.

More> Co.Design

When Jim Brett took over as West Elm’s president in 2010, he noticed a big issue that he immediately wanted to fix: chocolate boxes.
Jim Brett was haunted by mud-colored squares. When he started as West Elm’s president in 2010, he couldn’t believe how a furniture store could have so many products designed with such little imagination. “I was like, ‘Oh, my God, what’s with the brown boxes?’” he says. “The whole brand was brown boxes made in China. There wasn’t a curve in the store!” From couches to beds to dressers, much of the line consisted of low-slung angular block shapes covered in lifeless chocolate finishes. Even the West Elm logo was trapped inside a pair of overlapping squares. “It was all machine-made, all very clean and simple, and all very soulless,” says Brett. “I wanted to bring personality and soul and handmade into the business.”
Read more>

When Jim Brett took over as West Elm’s president in 2010, he noticed a big issue that he immediately wanted to fix: chocolate boxes.

Jim Brett was haunted by mud-colored squares. When he started as West Elm’s president in 2010, he couldn’t believe how a furniture store could have so many products designed with such little imagination. “I was like, ‘Oh, my God, what’s with the brown boxes?’” he says. “The whole brand was brown boxes made in China. There wasn’t a curve in the store!” From couches to beds to dressers, much of the line consisted of low-slung angular block shapes covered in lifeless chocolate finishes. Even the West Elm logo was trapped inside a pair of overlapping squares. “It was all machine-made, all very clean and simple, and all very soulless,” says Brett. “I wanted to bring personality and soul and handmade into the business.”

Read more>