FastCompany Magazine

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No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.
In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?
One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:
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No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.

In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?

One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:

Read More>

What Spotify and Echo Nest know about listener behavior is about to change the music industry.
Music’s shift to an all-you-can-stream model is convenient for listeners, tough for many artists, and potentially lucrative for the tech companies involved. It also has a hidden perk that could benefit all of them: Data. Lots of it.
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What Spotify and Echo Nest know about listener behavior is about to change the music industry.

Music’s shift to an all-you-can-stream model is convenient for listeners, tough for many artists, and potentially lucrative for the tech companies involved. It also has a hidden perk that could benefit all of them: Data. Lots of it.

Read More>

When the San Francisco Bay Area suffered its worst earthquake in 25 years on Sunday, with a 6.0 rattler in the Napa Valley, one company found themselves in an unusual place to collect data on the tragedy: Wireless device maker Jawbone.
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When the San Francisco Bay Area suffered its worst earthquake in 25 years on Sunday, with a 6.0 rattler in the Napa Valley, one company found themselves in an unusual place to collect data on the tragedy: Wireless device maker Jawbone.

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Sleep-Tracking Data Shows Who Was Jolted Awake By The Napa Earthquake
At 3:20 a.m. on Sunday morning, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake struck 9 miles south of Napa. It was the strongest quake to hit the Bay Area since 1989.
Now data prepared by Jawbone data scientist Brian Wilt gives us some insight into how strong the jolt was, using anonymous biometric data taken from thousands of Up health trackers worn by NorCal users affected by the quake. 
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Sleep-Tracking Data Shows Who Was Jolted Awake By The Napa Earthquake

At 3:20 a.m. on Sunday morning, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake struck 9 miles south of Napa. It was the strongest quake to hit the Bay Area since 1989.

Now data prepared by Jawbone data scientist Brian Wilt gives us some insight into how strong the jolt was, using anonymous biometric data taken from thousands of Up health trackers worn by NorCal users affected by the quake. 

Read More>

Who said humanities majors can’t work in tech?
Elizabeth Churchill, eBay’s director of human-computer interaction and a veteran of Yahoo and Xerox PARC, has a unique mandate: Getting data scientists inside the heads of different kinds of eBay customers.
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Who said humanities majors can’t work in tech?

Elizabeth Churchill, eBay’s director of human-computer interaction and a veteran of Yahoo and Xerox PARC, has a unique mandate: Getting data scientists inside the heads of different kinds of eBay customers.

Read More>

In a conflict as grisly as Syria’s civil war, getting humanitarian aid to those who need it can be a life-threatening affair. Fortunately for those hoping to help, data from sources like Twitter, YouTube, and a range of others lets researchers turn war into a giant data science project, helping understand the tension between groups, how armed they are, and where they’re headed next.
One year ago, Palantir Technologies donated their data organization software to nonprofit the Carter Center. “We wanted to see who the biggest fish amongst the opposition are, everyone relates to one another, and who’s funding who,” says Christopher McNaboe, who works on the Syria Conflict Mapping project. Now that the the U.N. has granted unauthorized border crossing into Syria to provide relief, that data can finally be put into action.
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In a conflict as grisly as Syria’s civil war, getting humanitarian aid to those who need it can be a life-threatening affair. Fortunately for those hoping to help, data from sources like Twitter, YouTube, and a range of others lets researchers turn war into a giant data science project, helping understand the tension between groups, how armed they are, and where they’re headed next.

One year ago, Palantir Technologies donated their data organization software to nonprofit the Carter Center. “We wanted to see who the biggest fish amongst the opposition are, everyone relates to one another, and who’s funding who,” says Christopher McNaboe, who works on the Syria Conflict Mapping project. Now that the the U.N. has granted unauthorized border crossing into Syria to provide relief, that data can finally be put into action.

Read More>

The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.
Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.
Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.
Read More>

The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.

Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.

Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.

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Michael Chasen is pitching me his new app, SocialRadar, and it sounds a little creepy. “I want you to walk into a room and know how you’re connected to everyone in there, because all of that information is in the cloud,” he says. “If you go an event, it will tell you, ‘There’s 12 people here you know. Three are friends, four are coworkers, two are people from college, one is a guy you ran into on the street, and three are friends of friends. And one just got a promotion, and another one just got married.’”



It sounds creepy, but it also sounds supremely useful.
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It sounds creepy, but it also sounds supremely useful.

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