FastCompany Magazine

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Why are advertising students in Alaska studying climate change? The question, says Deborah Morrison, is why isn’t the ad industry studying, and putting its creative might behind climate change, and humanity’s other BIG briefs.
“Why aren’t we as an industry front-and-center in working on the great, wicked issues of our day?”
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Why are advertising students in Alaska studying climate change? The question, says Deborah Morrison, is why isn’t the ad industry studying, and putting its creative might behind climate change, and humanity’s other BIG briefs.

Why aren’t we as an industry front-and-center in working on the great, wicked issues of our day?”

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How taking monotasking to an extreme can help you tackle ambitious projects.
Every March, Randi Zuckerberg goes on a spring break. Last year she went to New York; the year before she went to Tokyo. But unlike your standard vacation, Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media (and sister of Facebook CEO Mark), spends little time relaxing. Instead, she uses the time to focus exclusively and intensely on one project. This year she spent the month of March on Broadway, performing in Rock of Ages. In Tokyo, she holed up with her family to work on her book Dot Complicated.

"I understand this is not realistic for everyone to do," the former Facebooker told Fast Company. “I call it my deep-dive creative month.”
The idea, she says, came from Facebook’s hackathons, marathon coding events where engineers work on crazy ideas and passion projects. “There is something about that intense focus,” she said. “When you sit someone down and say you have 12 hours to crank something out, you see these amazing projects.” Her March deep dive takes that general principle and explodes it into a month-long work-a-thon.
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How taking monotasking to an extreme can help you tackle ambitious projects.

Every March, Randi Zuckerberg goes on a spring break. Last year she went to New York; the year before she went to Tokyo. But unlike your standard vacation, Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media (and sister of Facebook CEO Mark), spends little time relaxing. Instead, she uses the time to focus exclusively and intensely on one project. This year she spent the month of March on Broadway, performing in Rock of Ages. In Tokyo, she holed up with her family to work on her book Dot Complicated.

image

"I understand this is not realistic for everyone to do," the former Facebooker told Fast Company. “I call it my deep-dive creative month.”

The idea, she says, came from Facebook’s hackathons, marathon coding events where engineers work on crazy ideas and passion projects. “There is something about that intense focus,” she said. “When you sit someone down and say you have 12 hours to crank something out, you see these amazing projects.” Her March deep dive takes that general principle and explodes it into a month-long work-a-thon.

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In Praise Of Disciplined Creativity

As ‎executive director of Global Brand Marketing at General Electric (generalelectric)Linda Boff has the muscle of one of the world’s biggest technology innovators at her disposal. To cram the work of engineers and makers creating new things every day into the blip-sized limits of Twitter or Instagram is a true skill. 

Watch the video above to hear how working within these sort of creative constraints help focus GE pitch meetings.

The Science Of Tripping Balls, And Its Impact On Creativity
A new study reveals how hallucinogenic drugs put people in a more dream-like, “selfless,” and maybe creative state.
Scientists aren’t merely confirming that hallucinogens are fun to do. If the effects of these drugs could be harnessed, then theoretically, they could be used to deliberately fuel creative output. “It’s possible that we could learn what sort of mode the brain enters when one has creative insights on the drug and then maybe we could learn about how that could be harnessed without it,” says Robin Carhart-Harris, a post-doctoral researcher at the Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London and a co-author of the study.
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The Science Of Tripping Balls, And Its Impact On Creativity

A new study reveals how hallucinogenic drugs put people in a more dream-like, “selfless,” and maybe creative state.

Scientists aren’t merely confirming that hallucinogens are fun to do. If the effects of these drugs could be harnessed, then theoretically, they could be used to deliberately fuel creative output. “It’s possible that we could learn what sort of mode the brain enters when one has creative insights on the drug and then maybe we could learn about how that could be harnessed without it,” says Robin Carhart-Harris, a post-doctoral researcher at the Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London and a co-author of the study.

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cemiddleton:

One common hiring mistake: Hiring more of the same. Everyone thinking the same way doesn’t produce new results.

This is very different from finding talent who align and fit in with the culture.

I’m always confounded at the prevalence of this mistake. It limits creativity.

Another creativity-enducing nugget shared in this 40-second spot: Time away from the desk, quiet time to contemplate, talking with people who have diverse perspectives, and looking beyond your own backyard and outside your industry for new ideas.

(Consultants can also be a great source of alternative perspectives.)

For more on fastcompany:

The founder of travel startup Peek shares how she stays open to inspiration, wherever it finds her.

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10PM to 7AM: sleep. 9AM to 5PM: be a genius.
Even Beethoven and Balzac had just 24 hours in a day. How did history’s most prolific minds schedule their greatness?
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10PM to 7AM: sleep. 9AM to 5PM: be a genius.

Even Beethoven and Balzac had just 24 hours in a day. How did history’s most prolific minds schedule their greatness?

Read More>

The handpicked group of innovative do-gooders came from a broad spectrum of industries: startup founders, venture capitalists, a handful of Googlers, TV producers, bloggers, politicians, designers, Pulitzer winners, and the like. It may as well have been a gathering of the Illuminati-lite.
All of the conversations are off the record so as to encourage #realtalk, and you aren’t allowed to tweet after the first night, which lends Spark Camp a vague “the first rule of Fight Club is…" vibe.
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The handpicked group of innovative do-gooders came from a broad spectrum of industries: startup founders, venture capitalists, a handful of Googlers, TV producers, bloggers, politicians, designers, Pulitzer winners, and the like. It may as well have been a gathering of the Illuminati-lite.

All of the conversations are off the record so as to encourage #realtalk, and you aren’t allowed to tweet after the first night, which lends Spark Camp a vague “the first rule of Fight Club is…" vibe.

Read More>

From Jay-Z to de Balzac, these famous creative minds have developed some odd habits on the path to genius.
There is no secret formula for innovation, and a lot of great minds arrive at their creativity in many different ways.
Though we’d all like to crack the code for reaching our creative breakthrough, it’s likely that emulating the habits prescribed by one famous person or another won’t be the cure-all to your stagnated creativity. Though, there’s probably no harm in giving it a try.

So to satiate your voyeuristic curiosity, compiled here are some of the least orthodox, but still effective creative processes of eight great minds.
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From Jay-Z to de Balzac, these famous creative minds have developed some odd habits on the path to genius.

There is no secret formula for innovation, and a lot of great minds arrive at their creativity in many different ways.

Though we’d all like to crack the code for reaching our creative breakthrough, it’s likely that emulating the habits prescribed by one famous person or another won’t be the cure-all to your stagnated creativity. Though, there’s probably no harm in giving it a try.

So to satiate your voyeuristic curiosity, compiled here are some of the least orthodox, but still effective creative processes of eight great minds.

Read More>