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After months of work and anticipation, the winner of the Co.Labs and Target Retail Accelerator contest has been announced!

The challenged asked developers and designers tobuild a new kind of retail experience on top of Target’s e-commerce platform, going from a plan to a product in just 90 days. The winner? Social shopping app called Divvy, brought home the $75,000 grand prize.

Built by Team Pilot, Divvy is meant to make shopping more efficient- especially in a group setting. With features that make it easier to split bills, share copies of receipts, maintain shared transaction history, and earn rewards points, Divvy ultimately aims to lead to less trips to the store, less time wasted shopping, and a more transparent budget/expenditure situation for a family, group, or team.

Imagine a family out and about their daily activities. One family member decides to take a trip to Target. She can add other family members or friends to the shopping list, allowing them to contribute items. The family member at Target collects and buys the items, and the other family members or friends can settle up in-app, right away, along with receiving a copy of the itemized receipt and appropriately distributed rewards points.

Team Pilot was able to complete the app to such a degree that work is already underway to release it to the public under the official Target brand. It will be Target’s fourth mobile application.

Read more about Divvy and Team Pilot here

“When you concentrate on your inhale or exhale in a yoga posture, or on the sounds of a mantra in meditation, you are fully in the here and now. It’s only by slowing down that you can observe things as they really are, including yourself. Being in the now is hard work, but it also helps to give you some detachment and perspective on the dramas of your daily work and life.
'I would be interested in seeing studies conducted on the physical and psychological well-being of anyone trying to start up a company,' says Poikos CEO Nell Watson. ‘It’s easy to lose your grip on stuff, physically and mentally. Yoga is a powerful way of re-centering oneself and putting oneself back in the body and also in the current situation that you are in and not in the situation that you are worrying about.’”
Why coders need yoga

When you concentrate on your inhale or exhale in a yoga posture, or on the sounds of a mantra in meditation, you are fully in the here and now. It’s only by slowing down that you can observe things as they really are, including yourself. Being in the now is hard work, but it also helps to give you some detachment and perspective on the dramas of your daily work and life.

'I would be interested in seeing studies conducted on the physical and psychological well-being of anyone trying to start up a company,' says Poikos CEO Nell Watson. ‘It’s easy to lose your grip on stuff, physically and mentally. Yoga is a powerful way of re-centering oneself and putting oneself back in the body and also in the current situation that you are in and not in the situation that you are worrying about.’”

Why coders need yoga

Meet our tech editor, Chris Dannen. Chris edits Fast Company’s software and media experimentation site, Co.Labs. Here are the three best things he found on the Internet this week:
1. The “McDonald’s theory of bad ideas” This isn’t entirely new, but I love how Jason Jones recasts it to apply to group collaboration. We probably know what we’d all want in an ideal world. But the hardest part is establishing a floor—what suggestion sucks so much that we’d never do it? Let’s start there and work our way up. The by-product is that we all reveal what we consider to be “self-evidently bad,” a process which, in and of itself, can help everyone question their assumptions.
2. Julian Assange’s take on the new book by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt The book is, he says, “an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary,” a notion I find alternately horrifying and inspiring. The piece strikes at the core of my ambivalence about Google, which is a subject of something I’m writing this week, two weeks after my trip to their big developer conference. I’ve never come across a company with such vision in some areas—try out a Chromebook Pixel—and such a sad lack of humanity in others—ahem, Google Glass. Never has such a bipolar company had so much power, so much money, and such an uncertain future as they wean off display advertising.
3. ElectroFurI spotted the founder of this company at Google I/O wearing a full-length, multicolored glowing faux-fur coat that absolutely blew my mind. We’ve been covering the right (and wrong) way to design wearable technology, and I’m convinced this sort of thing—while obviously a little ostentatious for everyday use—is hinting at the most inspiring future for fashion design and software you wear.
If you want to learn more about Chris, check out his recent interview in Nieman Lab. He’ll also be presenting at the June 27 Hacks/Hackers meetup. Come and say hello!
 More recommendations from our team!

Meet our tech editor, Chris DannenChris edits Fast Company’s software and media experimentation site, Co.Labs. Here are the three best things he found on the Internet this week:

1. The “McDonald’s theory of bad ideas” 
This isn’t entirely new, but I love how Jason Jones recasts it to apply to group collaboration. We probably know what we’d all want in an ideal world. But the hardest part is establishing a floor—what suggestion sucks so much that we’d never do it? Let’s start there and work our way up. The by-product is that we all reveal what we consider to be “self-evidently bad,” a process which, in and of itself, can help everyone question their assumptions.

2. Julian Assange’s take on the new book by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt 
The book is, he says, “an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary,” a notion I find alternately horrifying and inspiring. The piece strikes at the core of my ambivalence about Google, which is a subject of something I’m writing this week, two weeks after my trip to their big developer conference. I’ve never come across a company with such vision in some areas—try out a Chromebook Pixel—and such a sad lack of humanity in others—ahem, Google Glass. Never has such a bipolar company had so much power, so much money, and such an uncertain future as they wean off display advertising.

3. ElectroFur
I spotted the founder of this company at Google I/O wearing a full-length, multicolored glowing faux-fur coat that absolutely blew my mind. We’ve been covering the right (and wrong) way to design wearable technology, and I’m convinced this sort of thing—while obviously a little ostentatious for everyday use—is hinting at the most inspiring future for fashion design and software you wear.

If you want to learn more about Chris, check out his recent interview in Nieman Lab. He’ll also be presenting at the June 27 Hacks/Hackers meetup. Come and say hello!

 More recommendations from our team!

Tracking Our Readers’ (Backhanded) Compliments
Our newest section Co.Lab’s is tracking reader feedback across social media platforms so that it can tailor its content to your needs…
Check them out.
And hit them up: 
By tweeting @fastcolabs or talking to them on App.net, Tumblr, Facebook or Google+.

Tracking Our Readers’ (Backhanded) Compliments

Our newest section Co.Lab’s is tracking reader feedback across social media platforms so that it can tailor its content to your needs…

Check them out.

And hit them up:

By tweeting @fastcolabs or talking to them on App.net, Tumblr, Facebook or Google+.

How The UN’s New Data Lab In Indonesia Uses Twitter To Preempt Disaster

Predictive disaster relief is the goal, says Robert Kirkpatrick, Director of the UN’s Global Pulse initiative, and Twitter data may be the key. The program uses social network analysis to study living conditions throughout the world and preempt crises. “We found that a combination of food words and mood state was able to predict the consumer price index several weeks ahead,” says Kirkpatrick.

Read the full article from our new section Co.Labs here.

How The UN’s New Data Lab In Indonesia Uses Twitter To Preempt Disaster

Predictive disaster relief is the goal, says Robert Kirkpatrick, Director of the UN’s Global Pulse initiative, and Twitter data may be the key. The program uses social network analysis to study living conditions throughout the world and preempt crises. “We found that a combination of food words and mood state was able to predict the consumer price index several weeks ahead,” says Kirkpatrick.

Read the full article from our new section Co.Labs here.

fastcodesign:

The Co.Labs And Target $75,000 Retail Accelerator Starts Here
Think you can build a mobile shopping app for one of the world’s best-known retailers? Here’s your chance to prove it.
Two of the biggest challenges to becoming a successful developer are finding an audience and growing to scale. But what if you could go all the way from discovery to mass market before the summer’s out? That’s the challenge of the Target Retail Accelerator, which we’re kicking off today.
The winner stands to make $75,000, and gets a chance to work with one of the leading innovators in the retail space. Seven finalists will also be awarded $10,000 each to turn their proposal into a prototype.

The goal: To build a mobile shopping experience that caters to customers who visit Target’s 1,778 stores. When the dust settles, the Co.Labs & Target Retail Accelerator will show the industry just what kind of magic the future of retail has in store.

Co.Labs, the newest member of Fast Company’s Co. network, tells the story of the open company, where the best technology ideas are ignited by the community. So we were excited to learn that a premier retailer wanted to open up its own data and infrastructure to set innovative minds in motion around the world. Target will offer API access to each of the seven finalists, marking the first time access has been granted to the public. Each finalist will also be paired with a liaison from Target to help their app fit the Target platform.
The submissions should be native mobile apps, mobile web apps, or another mobile service that extends the Target customer experience in some useful, instructive, or entertaining way. The entries should demonstrate not only a clear vision, but show how they will be implemented technologically using wireframes and plan documents. Target has outlined four key areas of interest, the winning apps should address one or more of these. Social: Enabling customers to interact with one another, or Target; Education: Helping students, teachers, and schools be more successful, and improving the community; In-store: Extending and improving the experience within the store, or until the next visit; Personalization: Catering to the unique tastes and needs of each individual customer.
A panel of expert judges, to be announced soon, will evaluate each entry based on these five criteria:
Completeness: the extent to which the application can fully execute a main task, and either fully or partially executes secondary tasks.
Design: the extent to which the application concept is easy to grasp, and the appropriate behavior inside the app is obvious.
Technical Expertise: the extent to which the application’s components are built in sensible, scalable frameworks.
Data: the extent to which the application creates (or makes use of) the data which are by products of Target consumer behavior.
Magic: the extent to which the application creates a user experience which evokes curiosity in the end user.
One important things to keep in mind before you enter: Target will own the app that wins. Finalists will receive seed money. Speaking of which, you really should read the contest rules before you enter.
Outstanding entries will be spotlit on Co.Labs as part of the Accelerator. We’re as interested in the process of creating a killer app as in the people behind it. The aim is to bring visibility to individual coders, teams, and startups who are unknown but doing great work.
Here are the key dates for the contest:March 8: Contest launchesApril 30: Last day for submissionsMay 13: Announcement of 7 FinalistsMay 14-30: Finalists work with Target to build their prototypeJune 3-24: Finalists present their final prototypes to TargetJuly 1: Announcement of the Grand Prize Winner
The deadline for entries is April 30, 2013. We are looking forward to seeing how you can disrupt the retail experience.

fastcodesign:

The Co.Labs And Target $75,000 Retail Accelerator Starts Here

Think you can build a mobile shopping app for one of the world’s best-known retailers? Here’s your chance to prove it.

Two of the biggest challenges to becoming a successful developer are finding an audience and growing to scale. But what if you could go all the way from discovery to mass market before the summer’s out? That’s the challenge of the Target Retail Accelerator, which we’re kicking off today.

The winner stands to make $75,000, and gets a chance to work with one of the leading innovators in the retail space. Seven finalists will also be awarded $10,000 each to turn their proposal into a prototype.

The goal: To build a mobile shopping experience that caters to customers who visit Target’s 1,778 stores. When the dust settles, the Co.Labs & Target Retail Accelerator will show the industry just what kind of magic the future of retail has in store.

Co.Labs, the newest member of Fast Company’s Co. network, tells the story of the open company, where the best technology ideas are ignited by the community. So we were excited to learn that a premier retailer wanted to open up its own data and infrastructure to set innovative minds in motion around the world. Target will offer API access to each of the seven finalists, marking the first time access has been granted to the public. Each finalist will also be paired with a liaison from Target to help their app fit the Target platform.

The submissions should be native mobile apps, mobile web apps, or another mobile service that extends the Target customer experience in some useful, instructive, or entertaining way. The entries should demonstrate not only a clear vision, but show how they will be implemented technologically using wireframes and plan documents. Target has outlined four key areas of interest, the winning apps should address one or more of these. Social: Enabling customers to interact with one another, or Target; Education: Helping students, teachers, and schools be more successful, and improving the community; In-store: Extending and improving the experience within the store, or until the next visit; Personalization: Catering to the unique tastes and needs of each individual customer.

A panel of expert judges, to be announced soon, will evaluate each entry based on these five criteria:

  • Completeness: the extent to which the application can fully execute a main task, and either fully or partially executes secondary tasks.
  • Design: the extent to which the application concept is easy to grasp, and the appropriate behavior inside the app is obvious.
  • Technical Expertise: the extent to which the application’s components are built in sensible, scalable frameworks.
  • Data: the extent to which the application creates (or makes use of) the data which are by products of Target consumer behavior.
  • Magic: the extent to which the application creates a user experience which evokes curiosity in the end user.

One important things to keep in mind before you enter: Target will own the app that wins. Finalists will receive seed money. Speaking of which, you really should read the contest rules before you enter.

Outstanding entries will be spotlit on Co.Labs as part of the Accelerator. We’re as interested in the process of creating a killer app as in the people behind it. The aim is to bring visibility to individual coders, teams, and startups who are unknown but doing great work.

Here are the key dates for the contest:

March 8: Contest launches
April 30: Last day for submissions
May 13: Announcement of 7 Finalists
May 14-30: Finalists work with Target to build their prototype
June 3-24: Finalists present their final prototypes to Target
July 1: Announcement of the Grand Prize Winner

The deadline for entries is April 30, 2013. We are looking forward to seeing how you can disrupt the retail experience.

(Source: fastcodesign, via fastcodesign)

Fast Company has launched a brand new site, Co.Labs. We couldn’t be more excited about it—in fact, we’ve been celebrating all weekend in Austin!

(Source: fastcolabs.com)

Meet Co.Labs! Fast Company’s new section dedicated to everything relating to software, software design, and coding! 

This site is a workshop where you, me and everyone else in the coding community can learn, share, collaborate and build.

Click here for a proper introduction.
Co.Labs will be SXSW this week to celebrate—and to launch the Co.Labs & Target Retail Accelerator, where an app you build can get seeded or acquired by Target before summer’s over. Enter the contest or show us what else you’re inventing in a tweet @fastcolabs. Follow along by subscribing for our newsletter.
Get excited!

Meet Co.Labs! Fast Company’s new section dedicated to everything relating to software, software design, and coding! 

This site is a workshop where you, me and everyone else in the coding community can learn, share, collaborate and build.

Click here for a proper introduction.

Co.Labs will be SXSW this week to celebrate—and to launch the Co.Labs & Target Retail Accelerator, where an app you build can get seeded or acquired by Target before summer’s over. Enter the contest or show us what else you’re inventing in a tweet @fastcolabs. Follow along by subscribing for our newsletter.

Get excited!