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"Bankruptcy," says Bob Marsh, CEO of LevelEleven, one of Detroit’s new startups, “gives me hope in what’s going to happen next. For decades, those of us living here have seen mismanagement and corruption and the same pattern: a new mayor comes in with plans on how to fix things and yet they keep getting worse. A lot of people here have wanted this to happen. It’s time to take drastic measures so the city can correct itself. Someone’s finally willing to take a pivot here.”
Here’s why filing for bankruptcy may actually signify a positive turning point for Detroit.
And here is more on Detroit:
How A Young Community Of Entrepreneurs Is Rebuilding Detroit
Detroiters On How To Make It In Detroit
Detroit Is Going Bankrupt—But Its Tech Community Is Going Strong
Remaking Detroit: Can Creative Companies Save An American City On The Brink?
A Haunting Look At Detroit, Its Inhabitants, And Its Attempts At Revival
Meet The Makers: Rebuilding Detroit By Hand
Beautifully Mashed-Up Photos Show The Glory And Wreckage Of Detroit

"Bankruptcy," says Bob Marsh, CEO of LevelEleven, one of Detroit’s new startups, “gives me hope in what’s going to happen next. For decades, those of us living here have seen mismanagement and corruption and the same pattern: a new mayor comes in with plans on how to fix things and yet they keep getting worse. A lot of people here have wanted this to happen. It’s time to take drastic measures so the city can correct itself. Someone’s finally willing to take a pivot here.”

Here’s why filing for bankruptcy may actually signify a positive turning point for Detroit.

And here is more on Detroit:

Our man Chuck Salter writes about how his dad found the handwritten Coke recipe that’s been making the Internet rounds today.


My dad, Charles Salter, took that photograph 32 years ago as a columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The column was called the “Georgia Rambler.” He’d travel the state looking for colorful people and places, often stories with a historical bent. One of his best sources was the late Everett Beal, a fishing buddy of his who worked as a pharmacist in Griffin, Ga. One day, Everett showed my dad his prized possession, a leather-bound book of recipes that had once belonged to a pharmacist named John Pemberton. The John Pemberton who created the original syrup to make Coke.
“Coco Cola Improved” was scrawled by hand on page 188, above a list of ingredients. My dad asked Everett if he thought it was the original formula for Coke. “I believe it is,” Everett told him.

Meanwhile, back in Atlanta, my dad showed a photo of the recipe to Coke and asked them the same question. “We don’t as a company comment on or confirm or deny any information you present to us about the formula for Coca-Cola,” my Dad quoted a spokesman saying.
You would think a column blowing the lid off Coke’s big secret would be front-page news in its home-town paper. A column with a photo of the recipe. But on February 18, 1979, “Is It Real Thing in Old Book?” ran inside the local news section, on 2B. And that was that. Remember, this was pre-Internet. This was even pre-cable news. CNN wouldn’t launch for another year. So the Coke column remained a favorite story my dad would recount, and he’d bring out that old photo of the recipe book cradled in Everett Beal’s weathered hands.





Swag. He goes into his dad’s reaction upon finding out that the story went viral and other fun stuff. Definitely worth reading in full.

Our man Chuck Salter writes about how his dad found the handwritten Coke recipe that’s been making the Internet rounds today.

My dad, Charles Salter, took that photograph 32 years ago as a columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The column was called the “Georgia Rambler.” He’d travel the state looking for colorful people and places, often stories with a historical bent. One of his best sources was the late Everett Beal, a fishing buddy of his who worked as a pharmacist in Griffin, Ga. One day, Everett showed my dad his prized possession, a leather-bound book of recipes that had once belonged to a pharmacist named John Pemberton. The John Pemberton who created the original syrup to make Coke.

“Coco Cola Improved” was scrawled by hand on page 188, above a list of ingredients. My dad asked Everett if he thought it was the original formula for Coke. “I believe it is,” Everett told him.

Meanwhile, back in Atlanta, my dad showed a photo of the recipe to Coke and asked them the same question. “We don’t as a company comment on or confirm or deny any information you present to us about the formula for Coca-Cola,” my Dad quoted a spokesman saying.

You would think a column blowing the lid off Coke’s big secret would be front-page news in its home-town paper. A column with a photo of the recipe. But on February 18, 1979, “Is It Real Thing in Old Book?” ran inside the local news section, on 2B. And that was that. Remember, this was pre-Internet. This was even pre-cable news. CNN wouldn’t launch for another year. So the Coke column remained a favorite story my dad would recount, and he’d bring out that old photo of the recipe book cradled in Everett Beal’s weathered hands.

Swag. He goes into his dad’s reaction upon finding out that the story went viral and other fun stuff. Definitely worth reading in full.