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Take a look at the chair you’re sitting in. What’s it made out of? Was it manufactured locally? Chances are, it’s constructed from a mix of materials that have a lengthy supply chain spanning much of the globe. Not so with the chairs made by Chairigami, a one-person company founded by recent Yale graduate Zach Rotholz. Chairigami’s furniture is made from local materials (near the company headquarters of New Haven, Connecticut), recyclable, lightweight, flat-packed, and easy to assemble. It’s also made entirely out of thick, triple-wall cardboard.

Take a look at the chair you’re sitting in. What’s it made out of? Was it manufactured locally? Chances are, it’s constructed from a mix of materials that have a lengthy supply chain spanning much of the globe. Not so with the chairs made by Chairigami, a one-person company founded by recent Yale graduate Zach Rotholz. Chairigami’s furniture is made from local materials (near the company headquarters of New Haven, Connecticut), recyclable, lightweight, flat-packed, and easy to assemble. It’s also made entirely out of thick, triple-wall cardboard.

Blam blam blam! Kablammo! We love shooting up our furniture with guns, cause why not. But thanks to Dutch designer Studio Bram Geenen, we won’t have to replace our bullet-riddled couches every week. Behold: lightweight, bulletproof (maybe not) furniture:

If your living room went on a crash diet, it’d look ‘round about like what you see here. The Light-room, by the staggeringly talented Dutch designer Studio Bram Geenen,  is an exercise in exploiting sexy new technology to reduce furniture to  mere skin and bones. It includes two chairs, a stool, a table, and a  set of shelves that, altogether, clock in at just 16.5 pounds — that’s  the average weight of one single chair.
Geenen futzed around with assorted manufacturing methods and  materials to keep the pounds off. Take the chair below, which is crafted  from Dyneema, a textile used to make bulletproof vests that’s said to be up to 15 times stronger than steel on a  weight-to-weight basis. By varying the stiffness of the fabric to  accommodate different stress points in the chair, he was able to produce  a fully functional piece of furniture that weighs less than a MacBook.
This shelving unit is made partly of Dyneema, too. The fiber creates a  wire support grid, with a “tensional” diagonal pattern. As a rule,  materials dealing with tensional forces can be very thin compared with a  material that has to be able to withstand compressive forces. Put  another way, the grid’s shape means that Geenen can use an ultra-light  material (Dyneema) without worrying that the whole unit’ll come crashing  to the ground under the duress of the collected works of William T.  Vollmann.
The benefits of featherweight furniture are pretty obvious. It  slashes energy consumption during production and transportation, and it  won’t break your back every time you want to rearrange the living room.  Light-room is only a prototype, but Geenen says he’s ready to go into  production. Check his website for updates.

Pictures when you click through! GIT-R-DONE.

Blam blam blam! Kablammo! We love shooting up our furniture with guns, cause why not. But thanks to Dutch designer Studio Bram Geenen, we won’t have to replace our bullet-riddled couches every week. Behold: lightweight, bulletproof (maybe not) furniture:

If your living room went on a crash diet, it’d look ‘round about like what you see here. The Light-room, by the staggeringly talented Dutch designer Studio Bram Geenen, is an exercise in exploiting sexy new technology to reduce furniture to mere skin and bones. It includes two chairs, a stool, a table, and a set of shelves that, altogether, clock in at just 16.5 pounds — that’s the average weight of one single chair.

Geenen futzed around with assorted manufacturing methods and materials to keep the pounds off. Take the chair below, which is crafted from Dyneema, a textile used to make bulletproof vests that’s said to be up to 15 times stronger than steel on a weight-to-weight basis. By varying the stiffness of the fabric to accommodate different stress points in the chair, he was able to produce a fully functional piece of furniture that weighs less than a MacBook.

This shelving unit is made partly of Dyneema, too. The fiber creates a wire support grid, with a “tensional” diagonal pattern. As a rule, materials dealing with tensional forces can be very thin compared with a material that has to be able to withstand compressive forces. Put another way, the grid’s shape means that Geenen can use an ultra-light material (Dyneema) without worrying that the whole unit’ll come crashing to the ground under the duress of the collected works of William T. Vollmann.

The benefits of featherweight furniture are pretty obvious. It slashes energy consumption during production and transportation, and it won’t break your back every time you want to rearrange the living room. Light-room is only a prototype, but Geenen says he’s ready to go into production. Check his website for updates.

Pictures when you click through! GIT-R-DONE.