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Millennials Don’t Care About Owning Cars, And Car Makers Can’t Figure Out Why
"What auto manufacturers, along with much of corporate America are missing here is that the vehicles to freedom and personal identity have changed for this generation. The sooner brands get a grip on this reality the sooner they can make adjustments in how they market to and communicate with this core group, which is essential to their long-term success."
More> Co.Exist

Millennials Don’t Care About Owning Cars, And Car Makers Can’t Figure Out Why

"What auto manufacturers, along with much of corporate America are missing here is that the vehicles to freedom and personal identity have changed for this generation. The sooner brands get a grip on this reality the sooner they can make adjustments in how they market to and communicate with this core group, which is essential to their long-term success."

More> Co.Exist

How’s this for bad PR? A Tesla Model S car burst into flames in Washington State this week after a relatively minor accident on a highway.
Tesla has reacted to the accident, noting that the car had a “direct impact” with a “large metallic object,” which hit “one of the 16 modules within the Model S battery pack.” 

How’s this for bad PR? A Tesla Model S car burst into flames in Washington State this week after a relatively minor accident on a highway.

Tesla has reacted to the accident, noting that the car had a “direct impact” with a “large metallic object,” which hit “one of the 16 modules within the Model S battery pack.” 

Garmin has come up with a windshield-mounted device that projects directions from Android and iPhone navigation apps right on the dashboard.
The Heads-Up Display (HUD), which sells for $130, is Garmin’s attempt to keep up with automakers who are installing smartphone apps directly into car dashboards. If Garmin can’t beat app makers for in-car presence, well, it’ll have to join them.
[Image: Garmin]

Garmin has come up with a windshield-mounted device that projects directions from Android and iPhone navigation apps right on the dashboard.

The Heads-Up Display (HUD), which sells for $130, is Garmin’s attempt to keep up with automakers who are installing smartphone apps directly into car dashboards. If Garmin can’t beat app makers for in-car presence, well, it’ll have to join them.

[Image: Garmin]

There are a lot of roads just sitting there in the sun, doing nothing with all that energy. Why not use them to collect it? Introducing the Solar Roadway, a road built out of solar panels. 
The road is made of three parts: a hard-wearing translucent top-layer with the solar cells, LED lights (for road markings) and a heating element (to keep off snow and ice); an electronics layer to control lighting and communications; and a base plate layer that distributes power to nearby homes and businesses (and perhaps electric vehicle charging stations). Plus, there’s a channel at the edge to collect and filter run-off water (including anti-freeze and other chemicals that normally leeches into the ground). 
More…

There are a lot of roads just sitting there in the sun, doing nothing with all that energy. Why not use them to collect it? Introducing the Solar Roadway, a road built out of solar panels. 

The road is made of three parts: a hard-wearing translucent top-layer with the solar cells, LED lights (for road markings) and a heating element (to keep off snow and ice); an electronics layer to control lighting and communications; and a base plate layer that distributes power to nearby homes and businesses (and perhaps electric vehicle charging stations). Plus, there’s a channel at the edge to collect and filter run-off water (including anti-freeze and other chemicals that normally leeches into the ground). 

More…

The lastest in Ken Block’s driftastic series earned over 20 million views in its first week.

In the hands of director Ben Conrad and veteran rally driver Ken Block, any drab stretch of concrete can be transformed into a vehicular playground. Block, who is also the founder of DC Shoes, became an Internet sensation in 2008, when he uploaded a video of himself practicing a little known motorsport called gymkhana, in which a skilled driver maneuvers a vehicle through an obstacle course. Watching Block’s gymkhana was a little like watching a floor exercise in Olympic gymnastics, but instead of sporting a leotard and bounding across a spring floor, he was strapped into a tricked-out, 650-horsepower rally car and let loose on an abandoned air field. The video went viral overnight.

How To Create A Viral Blockbuster The Gymkhana Way

The lastest in Ken Block’s driftastic series earned over 20 million views in its first week.

In the hands of director Ben Conrad and veteran rally driver Ken Block, any drab stretch of concrete can be transformed into a vehicular playground. Block, who is also the founder of DC Shoes, became an Internet sensation in 2008, when he uploaded a video of himself practicing a little known motorsport called gymkhana, in which a skilled driver maneuvers a vehicle through an obstacle course. Watching Block’s gymkhana was a little like watching a floor exercise in Olympic gymnastics, but instead of sporting a leotard and bounding across a spring floor, he was strapped into a tricked-out, 650-horsepower rally car and let loose on an abandoned air field. The video went viral overnight.

How To Create A Viral Blockbuster The Gymkhana Way