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Happy National Dog Day! Here are a few tips for a productive week that will hopefully have you feeling as happy as this guy! 
The 30-minute strategy for creating a successful path to your goals
5, like, totally awesome public speaking lessons from college admissions guides to use at work
6 simple rituals to reach your potential every day
Have a great week!

Happy National Dog DayHere are a few tips for a productive week that will hopefully have you feeling as happy as this guy! 

Have a great week!

I think tackling my fear is important, because it makes me present and accountable to myself, and keeps me living a meaningful life by testing my limits and my potential. We have no idea what we’re capable of achieving unless we try things and stretch the limits in our minds.

How one entrepreneur faced his biggest fears and found hard-fought success
Introverts (or those of us with introverted tendencies) tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds.
Extroverts, on the other hand, gain energy from other people. Extroverts actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social.
Are you an introvert or an extrovert? And what does it mean for your career?

Introverts (or those of us with introverted tendencies) tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds.

Extroverts, on the other hand, gain energy from other people. Extroverts actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social.

Are you an introvert or an extrovert? And what does it mean for your career?

"Be considerate and intentional with your life decisions. Rather than let life happen to you, author the story of your life. Author and philosopher Howard Thurman says it best with, ‘Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.’"
6 mindfulness practices to reframe your perspective
[Image: Holstee]

"Be considerate and intentional with your life decisions. Rather than let life happen to you, author the story of your life. Author and philosopher Howard Thurman says it best with, ‘Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.’"

6 mindfulness practices to reframe your perspective

[Image: Holstee]

nprfreshair:

The Khumbu Icefall on Mt. Everest.
Tomorrow: Outside Magazine writer Grayson Schaffer talks to Fresh Air about how being a Sherpa on Everest is the most dangerous job in the world:

It’s essentially the pinnacle of adventure tourism and the thing to understand about the Sherpa workforce is that there’s no other tourism industry in the world that so frequently kills and maims its workers for the benefit of paying clients, and it’s something that people haven’t yet connected the dots on. That a 1% mortality rate for someone choosing to climb a mountain is acceptable, but a 1% mortality for the people that they rely on to get their stuff up the mountain as a workplace safety statistic is outrageous … if you’re a western climber you’re climbing the mountain once and you’re done. If you’re a Sherpa you’re doing lap after lap after lap through this roulette wheel of hazards that we know has a death rate, long-term, of 1.2% and that number makes climbing Everest as a Sherpa more dangerous than working on a crab boat in Alaska, it makes it more dangerous than being an infantryman in the first four years of the Iraq war.

nprfreshair:

The Khumbu Icefall on Mt. Everest.


Tomorrow: Outside Magazine writer Grayson Schaffer talks to Fresh Air about how being a Sherpa on Everest is the most dangerous job in the world:

It’s essentially the pinnacle of adventure tourism and the thing to understand about the Sherpa workforce is that there’s no other tourism industry in the world that so frequently kills and maims its workers for the benefit of paying clients, and it’s something that people haven’t yet connected the dots on. That a 1% mortality rate for someone choosing to climb a mountain is acceptable, but a 1% mortality for the people that they rely on to get their stuff up the mountain as a workplace safety statistic is outrageous … if you’re a western climber you’re climbing the mountain once and you’re done. If you’re a Sherpa you’re doing lap after lap after lap through this roulette wheel of hazards that we know has a death rate, long-term, of 1.2% and that number makes climbing Everest as a Sherpa more dangerous than working on a crab boat in Alaska, it makes it more dangerous than being an infantryman in the first four years of the Iraq war.