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  • "Why don’t you tell me about yourself?"

This question, often the interview opener, has a crucial objective: to see how you handle yourself in unstructured situations. The recruiter wants to see how articulate you are, how confident you are, and generally what type of impression you would make on the people with whom you come into contact on the job. The recruiter also wants to learn about the trajectory of your career and to get a sense of what you think is important and what has caused you to perform well.

There are many ways to respond to this question correctly and just one wrong way: by asking, “What do you want to know?” You need to develop a good answer to this question, practice it, and be able to deliver it with poise and confidence.

The right response is twofold: focus on what interests the interviewer, and highlight your most important accomplishments.

More tips

“Remember this sentence, tape it to your monitor, tattoo it on your wrist: You don’t have to ‘feel like’ doing something in order to do it.”
“When I manage to remember that, I’m no longer sidetracked by trying to get into the right frame of mind for daunting projects. Don’t beat yourself up for procrastinatory feelings. Just feel them, and simultaneously direct your limbs to do the work.”
11 expert tips to help you be more productive in 2014

“Remember this sentence, tape it to your monitor, tattoo it on your wrist: You don’t have to ‘feel like’ doing something in order to do it.

“When I manage to remember that, I’m no longer sidetracked by trying to get into the right frame of mind for daunting projects. Don’t beat yourself up for procrastinatory feelings. Just feel them, and simultaneously direct your limbs to do the work.”

11 expert tips to help you be more productive in 2014

This office is designed specifically to make people feel… at ease. 

"You’re looking for what is that unique insight, that point of view, that thing that no one else sees. If you can create a conversation where that can really come out, and can give them the comfort to put as much of themselves out on the table as possible, you learn a lot more about them."

"Big data is going to make us all healthier. What kind of diet should certain people be on? Are there things people are doing that make them really high-risk for cancer? There’s a whole group of people who are 100-plus and have no disease. Why?”
—Anne Wojcicki, founder and CEO of genetic-testing startup 23andMe, has two goals: bringing the power of genetic testing to everyday consumers so they can better manage their own health care, and using the aggregated data from those tests to help doctors, scientists, hospitals, and researchers discover new cures for diseases that emanate from troublesome genetic mutations. We spoke to Wojcicki about her plans to revolutionize DNA testing

"Big data is going to make us all healthier. What kind of diet should certain people be on? Are there things people are doing that make them really high-risk for cancer? There’s a whole group of people who are 100-plus and have no disease. Why?”

—Anne Wojcicki, founder and CEO of genetic-testing startup 23andMe, has two goals: bringing the power of genetic testing to everyday consumers so they can better manage their own health care, and using the aggregated data from those tests to help doctors, scientists, hospitals, and researchers discover new cures for diseases that emanate from troublesome genetic mutations. We spoke to Wojcicki about her plans to revolutionize DNA testing

Trying to explain a panic attack to someone for whom anxiety is not an issue is like speaking in a foreign language. You really think your world is caving in. You’re going to have a heart attack. And no matter how many times it happens, it still feels like the world is falling out from your butt every. Single. Time.

So what are you supposed to do when it drifts into your work life and career? I’m lucky in that when I started my own company I had to pitch myself and my services constantly. Doing the things that scare you more often makes them less scary.

CEO of FinePoint Digital PR Meredith Fineman suffers from panic attacks, but won’t let them destroy her life or work
CEOs earned 273 times the average worker in 2012—and that’s going up
According to the Economic Policy Institute, in 2012, average CEO compensation among the 350 largest U.S. public companies was $14.1 million (including income from options), which was a 12.7% increase on 2011, and 37.4% jump over 2009.
Some economists explain this higher-than-the-highest phenomenon by saying that CEOs’ jobs are becoming more difficult, and that they therefore should be paid better. But the EPI favors a different explanation: that CEOs hold the reins of their organizations and can win the compensation that suits them. 
[Image: Lildevil4ever]

CEOs earned 273 times the average worker in 2012—and that’s going up

According to the Economic Policy Institute, in 2012, average CEO compensation among the 350 largest U.S. public companies was $14.1 million (including income from options), which was a 12.7% increase on 2011, and 37.4% jump over 2009.

Some economists explain this higher-than-the-highest phenomenon by saying that CEOs’ jobs are becoming more difficult, and that they therefore should be paid better. But the EPI favors a different explanation: that CEOs hold the reins of their organizations and can win the compensation that suits them. 

[Image: Lildevil4ever]

Ron Johnson’s 5 Key Mistakes at JC Penney, In His Own Words
Fast Company talked to former JC Penney CEO Ron Johnson three months into his new job. What he said then explains why things didn’t work out.
Here’s the full story.
But here are 5 lessons taken away from Johnson’s miscalculations:
1. JC Penney Is Not A Startup, And Therefore Can’t Behave Like One
2. Not All Business Decisions Can Rely Solely On Gut
3. JC Penney Isn’t Apple
4. Managing A Team Within A Company Requires Different Leadership Skills Than Being The CEO Of A Company
5. Behemoth Businesses Can’t Be Reinvented Overnight
What can you learn from Johnson’s JC Penny disaster?

Ron Johnson’s 5 Key Mistakes at JC Penney, In His Own Words

Fast Company talked to former JC Penney CEO Ron Johnson three months into his new job. What he said then explains why things didn’t work out.

Here’s the full story.

But here are 5 lessons taken away from Johnson’s miscalculations:

1. JC Penney Is Not A Startup, And Therefore Can’t Behave Like One

2. Not All Business Decisions Can Rely Solely On Gut

3. JC Penney Isn’t Apple

4. Managing A Team Within A Company Requires Different Leadership Skills Than Being The CEO Of A Company

5. Behemoth Businesses Can’t Be Reinvented Overnight

What can you learn from Johnson’s JC Penny disaster?

An intimate portrait of the world’s most famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But the moment belonged first and foremost to Zuckerberg, who for years has had his own identity problem: “boy CEO.” Young, arrogant, and awkward—no one believed that Zuckerberg could survive the adult swim of real business, and thanks to his depiction in The Social Network, some folks will forever see him as the fatally flawed psychopathic robot nerd looking to steal your code, your personal data, your girlfriend. “I don’t think about it … much,” he once told me when I asked him how he handles all the noise, measuring his words as he always does. “I understand why people need to have these dialogues, to ask these questions. We have so much to do here, we don’t think about it if we don’t have to.”

Read on->

An intimate portrait of the world’s most famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But the moment belonged first and foremost to Zuckerberg, who for years has had his own identity problem: “boy CEO.” Young, arrogant, and awkward—no one believed that Zuckerberg could survive the adult swim of real business, and thanks to his depiction in The Social Network, some folks will forever see him as the fatally flawed psychopathic robot nerd looking to steal your code, your personal data, your girlfriend. “I don’t think about it … much,” he once told me when I asked him how he handles all the noise, measuring his words as he always does. “I understand why people need to have these dialogues, to ask these questions. We have so much to do here, we don’t think about it if we don’t have to.”

Read on->

 Nearly 20% of Female Chinese Managers Are CEOs 

Among China’s female workforce in managerial positions, 19% hold the  title of CEO, according to the Grant Thornton Business Report released this week. That’s 10% higher than averages in Europe and 14% higher than averages in the United States, according to the report.
Thailand came in first at a whopping 30% of female managers  holding the title of CEO and Taiwan came in third at 18%, pointing to a  possible emerging trend in Asia for women to more routinely hold the  position of CEO. (The exception is Japan, where only 8% of senior  managers are women.)
Also of note is that of the companies that employ women in senior  positions, 69% work in financial departments, not the so-called softer  area of human resources.
"With China becoming an economic powerhouse, its society offers  more opportunities for women’s development," said Xu Hua, chairman of  Grant Thornton Jingdu Tianhua.
Women in China also make up half of the University student  population and 34% of senior management, a 3% increase from two years  ago. In the rest of the world, the number of women in senior management  positions has actually decreased, from 24% in 2009 to 20%. With Asia  increasing in global stature and as the region is increasingly willing  to try different approaches in business and innovation, out of sheer  competition with the West, the emergence of women may become the new  trend.

Nearly 20% of Female Chinese Managers Are CEOs

Among China’s female workforce in managerial positions, 19% hold the title of CEO, according to the Grant Thornton Business Report released this week. That’s 10% higher than averages in Europe and 14% higher than averages in the United States, according to the report.

Thailand came in first at a whopping 30% of female managers holding the title of CEO and Taiwan came in third at 18%, pointing to a possible emerging trend in Asia for women to more routinely hold the position of CEO. (The exception is Japan, where only 8% of senior managers are women.)

Also of note is that of the companies that employ women in senior positions, 69% work in financial departments, not the so-called softer area of human resources.

"With China becoming an economic powerhouse, its society offers more opportunities for women’s development," said Xu Hua, chairman of Grant Thornton Jingdu Tianhua.

Women in China also make up half of the University student population and 34% of senior management, a 3% increase from two years ago. In the rest of the world, the number of women in senior management positions has actually decreased, from 24% in 2009 to 20%. With Asia increasing in global stature and as the region is increasingly willing to try different approaches in business and innovation, out of sheer competition with the West, the emergence of women may become the new trend.