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Capsule — arguably the most influential men’s fashion tradeshow in North America — started from an unlikely source: Shiny, expensive t-shirts.

The first Capsule show back in 2007 featured just 45 designers. Now the show carves out room for 777 designers from 25 countries around the world.

BMPW founders: Edina Sultanik, Deirdre Maloney, and Minya Quirk
"A great candidate for Capsule is a brand that’s made by real people who love what they’re doing on a small to mid-sized level," says Minya Quirk. 
Read More>

Capsule — arguably the most influential men’s fashion tradeshow in North America — started from an unlikely source: Shiny, expensive t-shirts.

image

The first Capsule show back in 2007 featured just 45 designers. Now the show carves out room for 777 designers from 25 countries around the world.

image

BMPW founders: Edina Sultanik, Deirdre Maloney, and Minya Quirk

"A great candidate for Capsule is a brand that’s made by real people who love what they’re doing on a small to mid-sized level," says Minya Quirk. 

Read More>

To many, the concept Summer Fridays—a half day or day off every week during vacation season—seems more myth than reality.
Instead of leaving work early on a Friday, we often spend more time chained to our desks, struggling to come up with new ways to keep our productivity up, turning the so-called summer slow-down into a time just as busy as any other.
But what if the solution to lower summer productivity levels is more time off? How could this possibly make sense?
Well, we asked a number of bosses for their thoughts on implementing a Summer Friday policy, and what they had to say may surprise you.
Read More>

To many, the concept Summer Fridays—a half day or day off every week during vacation season—seems more myth than reality.

Instead of leaving work early on a Friday, we often spend more time chained to our desks, struggling to come up with new ways to keep our productivity up, turning the so-called summer slow-down into a time just as busy as any other.

But what if the solution to lower summer productivity levels is more time off? How could this possibly make sense?

Well, we asked a number of bosses for their thoughts on implementing a Summer Friday policy, and what they had to say may surprise you.

Read More>

Seven of this year’s Forty Over 40 Women to Watch honorees share how innovation improves with age.
Red wine. Cheese. Innovation. Yes, these are all things that get better with age. Don’t believe it? Science offers some pretty compelling evidence that wunderkinds are the exception, rather than the rule.
One researcher found that Nobel Prize winners’ age around a significant breakthrough is about 38 (and not recognized until they’re 60) and another posits that a lifetime of learning leads to greater breakthroughs between ages 55-65. Data from the Kauffmann Foundation bears this out as findings indicate people over 55 are almost twice as likely to found successful companies than those between 20 and 34.
These statistics are seldom recognized, much less celebrated, in a youth obsessed culture, according to Whitney Johnson, author and cofounder of investment firm Rose Park Advisors. That’s why she and Christina Vuleta, founder of Women’s career advice forum 40:20 Vision, took matters into their own hands.
They started an initiative, dubbed Forty Over 40 in 2013 to change the idea that mid-life means you’re on the down side of over-the-hill. This year’s honorees range from 40 to over 60 and come from a variety of industries including the arts, law, retail, health care, and tech. Each has an impressive resume, not limited to an accumulation of greater titles and industry accolades.
As Johnson writes, “At age 40 we’re just getting to the best part. After spending years on the low end of the S-curve of experience, we are now ready to accelerate into a sweet spot of competence and contribution.”
With that in mind, we asked several of this year’s honorees to share their thoughts on aging, disruption, and transitions. Here’s what they told us.
Read More>

Seven of this year’s Forty Over 40 Women to Watch honorees share how innovation improves with age.

Red wine. Cheese. Innovation. Yes, these are all things that get better with age. Don’t believe it? Science offers some pretty compelling evidence that wunderkinds are the exception, rather than the rule.

One researcher found that Nobel Prize winners’ age around a significant breakthrough is about 38 (and not recognized until they’re 60) and another posits that a lifetime of learning leads to greater breakthroughs between ages 55-65. Data from the Kauffmann Foundation bears this out as findings indicate people over 55 are almost twice as likely to found successful companies than those between 20 and 34.

These statistics are seldom recognized, much less celebrated, in a youth obsessed culture, according to Whitney Johnson, author and cofounder of investment firm Rose Park Advisors. That’s why she and Christina Vuleta, founder of Women’s career advice forum 40:20 Vision, took matters into their own hands.

They started an initiative, dubbed Forty Over 40 in 2013 to change the idea that mid-life means you’re on the down side of over-the-hill. This year’s honorees range from 40 to over 60 and come from a variety of industries including the arts, law, retail, health care, and tech. Each has an impressive resume, not limited to an accumulation of greater titles and industry accolades.

As Johnson writes, “At age 40 we’re just getting to the best part. After spending years on the low end of the S-curve of experience, we are now ready to accelerate into a sweet spot of competence and contribution.”

With that in mind, we asked several of this year’s honorees to share their thoughts on aging, disruption, and transitions. Here’s what they told us.

Read More>

cemiddleton:

One common hiring mistake: Hiring more of the same. Everyone thinking the same way doesn’t produce new results.

This is very different from finding talent who align and fit in with the culture.

I’m always confounded at the prevalence of this mistake. It limits creativity.

Another creativity-enducing nugget shared in this 40-second spot: Time away from the desk, quiet time to contemplate, talking with people who have diverse perspectives, and looking beyond your own backyard and outside your industry for new ideas.

(Consultants can also be a great source of alternative perspectives.)

For more on fastcompany:

The founder of travel startup Peek shares how she stays open to inspiration, wherever it finds her.

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