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Jaime Weston, VP of Brand & Creative for the NFL, says the league pulled together on its brand only after consulting its MVPs: the fans.
"We did a lot of work with our fans to understand our brand essence, which comes down to three words: intense, meaningful, and unifying."
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Jaime Weston, VP of Brand & Creative for the NFL, says the league pulled together on its brand only after consulting its MVPs: the fans.

"We did a lot of work with our fans to understand our brand essence, which comes down to three words: intense, meaningful, and unifying."

Read More>

Cramming in a mind-melting series of visual allusions, the $3 million WTC logo is also an ad.
The World Trade Center has a new logo. Part of a $3.57 million branding endeavor, it’s a riff on space and negative space, presence, and absence. It’s like a Rubin vase test, playing tricks on the eye and asking viewers to see what they want to see. Which would almost be poetic if not for the fact that it could also be read as an ad for a luxury shopping mall.
Read More>

Cramming in a mind-melting series of visual allusions, the $3 million WTC logo is also an ad.

The World Trade Center has a new logo. Part of a $3.57 million branding endeavor, it’s a riff on space and negative space, presence, and absence. It’s like a Rubin vase test, playing tricks on the eye and asking viewers to see what they want to see. Which would almost be poetic if not for the fact that it could also be read as an ad for a luxury shopping mall.

Read More>

A Dutch designer imagines a better way to brand the Korean giant.
For 21 years, the Samsung name as served as the company logo, occasionally superimposed over a wobbly blue oval. It’s the kind of logo that’s fine on washing machines and televisions, but incredibly boring on something personal, like a smartphone. Never is this more apparent than when compared to the branding of Samsung’s arch-enemy in Cupertino, which is simply the silhouette of an apple.
Regardless, Samsung sells more smartphones and tablets than even Apple does. Doesn’t it deserve branding just as good?
Read More>

A Dutch designer imagines a better way to brand the Korean giant.

For 21 years, the Samsung name as served as the company logo, occasionally superimposed over a wobbly blue oval. It’s the kind of logo that’s fine on washing machines and televisions, but incredibly boring on something personal, like a smartphone. Never is this more apparent than when compared to the branding of Samsung’s arch-enemy in Cupertino, which is simply the silhouette of an apple.

Regardless, Samsung sells more smartphones and tablets than even Apple does. Doesn’t it deserve branding just as good?

Read More>