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If you don’t want to slam the brakes on your next brainstorming session, avoid these idea-killing phrases.
Ideas are fragile—they’re easily shattered by snubs, smirks, and scorn. And brainstorms are equally delicate. The wrong words at the wrong time bring brainstorming to a screeching halt.
The function of brainstorming has received its share of badmouthing in recent years, often for good cause. And many of those problems stem from statements made before or during brainstorming sessions.
For healthy brainstorming and bountiful ideas, always steer clear of these seven sentences:
Read More>

If you don’t want to slam the brakes on your next brainstorming session, avoid these idea-killing phrases.

Ideas are fragile—they’re easily shattered by snubs, smirks, and scorn. And brainstorms are equally delicate. The wrong words at the wrong time bring brainstorming to a screeching halt.

The function of brainstorming has received its share of badmouthing in recent years, often for good cause. And many of those problems stem from statements made before or during brainstorming sessions.

For healthy brainstorming and bountiful ideas, always steer clear of these seven sentences:

Read More>

The Brainstorming Process Is B.S. But Can We Rework It?

People in groups tend to sit back and let others do the work; they instinctively mimic others’ opinions and lose sight of their own; and, often succumb to peer pressure. The Emory University neuroscientist Gregory Berns found that when we take a stance different from the group’s, we activate the amygdala, a small organ in the brain associated with the fear of rejection. Professor Berns calls this “the pain of independence.”

Read on->

The Brainstorming Process Is B.S. But Can We Rework It?

People in groups tend to sit back and let others do the work; they instinctively mimic others’ opinions and lose sight of their own; and, often succumb to peer pressure. The Emory University neuroscientist Gregory Berns found that when we take a stance different from the group’s, we activate the amygdala, a small organ in the brain associated with the fear of rejection. Professor Berns calls this “the pain of independence.”

Read on->