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This is the new HTC One. 

So what’s new about it?
At first glance it looks awfully similar to the old one, no? There are quite a few hardware differences once you spend some time with it, though. The screen is a little bigger (5.0 inches versus 4.7 inches) and its all-metal body has a little more heft to it. During a pre-briefing, the phone felt very sturdy. Solid. “This year with the HTC One we really wanted to double down on what was working very well on that design, which was about 70% metal,” Scott Croyle, HTC senior vice president of design, told Fast Company. “We’re actually able to get 90% metal now… all the way around to the front housing. It creates fewer breaks and a purer design.”

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Hopefully today doesn’t have you feeling like this guy. Here are a few tips to get you pumped up and productive this week:
Free your mind and your apps will follow: this week’s (best) free Android and iPhone apps
The quiet power of silencing your phone
Why treating life like an experiment will help you make faster decisions
[Image: Flickr user Aftab Uzzaman]

Hopefully today doesn’t have you feeling like this guy. Here are a few tips to get you pumped up and productive this week:

[Image: Flickr user Aftab Uzzaman]

Google’s Android operating system is a lot like C-3PO at the end of The Empire Strikes Back. It’s a robot that has been blasted apart into a million pieces, and the only self-contained, functional bit is being carried around on the back of a big, hairy Wookiee that can tear the arms off of anyone in the room.
That’s the takeaway from a series of charts released by Open Signal, a company that has two popular apps available for measuring your smartphone reception: one on Android’s Google Play market, and one onthe iOS App Store. By polling devices that are running the app, Open Signal can see what the most common models, operating systems, and screen sizes are being used across Google and Apple’s product ecosystems. But if there’s one thing that these infographics make clear, it’s that Android has a huge problem: It’s fragmented.

Google’s Android operating system is a lot like C-3PO at the end of The Empire Strikes Back. It’s a robot that has been blasted apart into a million pieces, and the only self-contained, functional bit is being carried around on the back of a big, hairy Wookiee that can tear the arms off of anyone in the room.

That’s the takeaway from a series of charts released by Open Signal, a company that has two popular apps available for measuring your smartphone reception: one on Android’s Google Play market, and one onthe iOS App Store. By polling devices that are running the app, Open Signal can see what the most common models, operating systems, and screen sizes are being used across Google and Apple’s product ecosystems. But if there’s one thing that these infographics make clear, it’s that Android has a huge problem: It’s fragmented.

"At one level, [Home] is just the next mobile version of Facebook. At a deeper level, I think this can start to be a change in the relationship that we have with how we use computing devices." -Mark Zuckerberg at the Facebook Home announcement address.

Reading Between The Lines Of Mark Zuckerberg’s Vision Statement

Home, Facebook’s new Android app-slash-skin, is worth investigating. It runs along a new axis of user experience, un-cordons the app, and shows how Facebook is becoming less of a product and more of a service.

But beyond being immersive, low-friction, and whatever other buzzword descriptors you’d like to attach to it, Home is a recognition a subtle and profound paradigm shift.

See our Takeaways from his address here.

The Facebook Phone is finally here. And, as expected, it’s not really a phone at all.
Home, as the new product is called, is a free, downloadable skin that gives existing Android phone a total Facebook makeover, transforming both lock and home screens into immersive, edge-to-edge slideshows of photos and status updates.

The Facebook Phone is finally here. And, as expected, it’s not really a phone at all.

Home, as the new product is called, is a free, downloadable skin that gives existing Android phone a total Facebook makeover, transforming both lock and home screens into immersive, edge-to-edge slideshows of photos and status updates.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)

Forget about checking Facebook on your iPhone or Android app. Or waiting until you get home. The social network introduced its own addition to the Android operating system in a highly-anticipated announcement today, called “Home.”

Home is a series of apps that you can install and that becomes the home of your phone.

"Our phones are designed around apps not people," Zuckerberg said. "We want to flip that around."

Forget about checking Facebook on your iPhone or Android app. Or waiting until you get home. The social network introduced its own addition to the Android operating system in a highly-anticipated announcement today, called “Home.”

Home is a series of apps that you can install and that becomes the home of your phone.

"Our phones are designed around apps not people," Zuckerberg said. "We want to flip that around."