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Aaron Harris of Tutorspree did the math, and it turns out that on a 13-inch Macbook Air, a mere 13% of Google’s results page are dedicated to results when searching “auto mechanic.” Meaning more than twice that space is spent on ads—yielding almost four times the number of links.

Imagine that in any other context—maybe a TV show in which the commercials were the main attraction—and it’s beyond absurd.

"I was getting home late and just wanted to grab some easy pre-made food from the local supermarket. While there, I remembered that I needed a few things and navigated my way to the paper towel aisle, where I stood, transfixed, before 50 feet of options. I was tired and hungry and very suddenly annoyed. All I wanted was to be able to clean my face after eating and now I was confronted with 50 feet of choice. Screw the mustachioed Brawny man, the quicker picker upper, and the boldly named Mardi Gras.
In the midst of my existential meltdown, I left the store without buying anything.”
Studies show that too many choices intimidate consumers—can we make the purchasing process less painful?
[Paper Towel Mess: Jcjgphotography via Shutterstock]

"I was getting home late and just wanted to grab some easy pre-made food from the local supermarket. While there, I remembered that I needed a few things and navigated my way to the paper towel aisle, where I stood, transfixed, before 50 feet of options. I was tired and hungry and very suddenly annoyed. All I wanted was to be able to clean my face after eating and now I was confronted with 50 feet of choice. Screw the mustachioed Brawny man, the quicker picker upper, and the boldly named Mardi Gras.

In the midst of my existential meltdown, I left the store without buying anything.”

Studies show that too many choices intimidate consumers—can we make the purchasing process less painful?

[Paper Towel Mess: Jcjgphotography via Shutterstock]

A print ad that declares "I wish my son had cancer," has sparked debate about what is and what is not a suitable tone and sentiment in charity advertising.

The ad is for Harrison’s Fund—a charity set up by the parents of Harrison, a 6-year-old boy with the degenerative condition Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is incurable, barely known outside medical circles, and receives little research funding. Here’s the full ad, and the rest of the story

7 Questions Every Head Of Marketing Better Be Able To Answer

CEO Francine Hardaway: 
"Brands are promises that get delivered every day. What did you promise today?"

CMOs have it tough. Not only do they have to account for every single dollar invested in marketing but they have to be part engineer, part marketer, and part financial guru.
Although most industries have been disintermediated by technology, the marketing industry worked backwards. More and more intermediaries now stand between the brand the publisher. It used to be only an agency. Now it’s many agencies and a plethora of tech vendors.
To complicate matters more, the marketing mix is expanding daily and now includes more buzzwords and acronyms so that you don’t pay any attention to the people behind the curtain. The savvy CMO is going to have to learn what questions to ask. Working with Proximic and its special way of helping brands deal with their own data to plan media has taught me to ask the right questions. The answers will be different for each of you.
Does this algorithm work for me?
Do I need RTB (real-time bidding) or RTM (real-time marketing)?
What’s more important, targeting the right person or delivering the right message? And do I need a cookie to know?
Do I know that where I’m appearing is brand safe?
What’s premium now?
Where does digital fit in my overall media mix?
What do I do with “Social-Mobile-Local”?
Remember: All advertising starts with a problem (e.g., one of your brands needs to gain share versus a competitor or need to protect share from a competitor). The only ROI that really matters is Did you “move the needle”? Did you move product or move minds? To do either, that message has to break through the clutter. That’s all. No other metric matters.
Read the full story here.
 
[Image: Flickr user Tony L. Wong]

7 Questions Every Head Of Marketing Better Be Able To Answer

CEO Francine Hardaway:

"Brands are promises that get delivered every day. What did you promise today?"

CMOs have it tough. Not only do they have to account for every single dollar invested in marketing but they have to be part engineer, part marketer, and part financial guru.

Although most industries have been disintermediated by technology, the marketing industry worked backwards. More and more intermediaries now stand between the brand the publisher. It used to be only an agency. Now it’s many agencies and a plethora of tech vendors.

To complicate matters more, the marketing mix is expanding daily and now includes more buzzwords and acronyms so that you don’t pay any attention to the people behind the curtain. The savvy CMO is going to have to learn what questions to ask. Working with Proximic and its special way of helping brands deal with their own data to plan media has taught me to ask the right questions. The answers will be different for each of you.

Does this algorithm work for me?

Do I need RTB (real-time bidding) or RTM (real-time marketing)?

What’s more important, targeting the right person or delivering the right message? And do I need a cookie to know?

Do I know that where I’m appearing is brand safe?

What’s premium now?

Where does digital fit in my overall media mix?

What do I do with “Social-Mobile-Local”?

Remember: All advertising starts with a problem (e.g., one of your brands needs to gain share versus a competitor or need to protect share from a competitor). The only ROI that really matters is Did you “move the needle”? Did you move product or move minds? To do either, that message has to break through the clutter. That’s all. No other metric matters.

Read the full story here.

 

[Image: Flickr user Tony L. Wong]