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First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?
Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.
It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)
Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.
Let us count the ways this is absurd.
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First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?

Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.

It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)

Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.

Let us count the ways this is absurd.

Read More>

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.
To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.

To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

A look at the six most popular newsletters on TinyLetter and what they’re doing right.
So you want to start a newsletter. The medium is having a moment, a phenomenon even the New York Times' esteemed media critic has noticed. The time to jump on the bandwagon, before brands take over and ruin everything, is now.
But how? Fast Company spoke with TinyLetter, the platform of choice for newsletter writers, about what aspiring email tycoons can learn from its most popular emailers.

These are the six most popular and influential personal newsletters, in no particular order, according to TinyLetter’s internal numbers.
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A look at the six most popular newsletters on TinyLetter and what they’re doing right.

So you want to start a newsletter. The medium is having a moment, a phenomenon even the New York Timesesteemed media critic has noticed. The time to jump on the bandwagon, before brands take over and ruin everything, is now.

But how? Fast Company spoke with TinyLetter, the platform of choice for newsletter writers, about what aspiring email tycoons can learn from its most popular emailers.

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These are the six most popular and influential personal newsletters, in no particular order, according to TinyLetter’s internal numbers.

Read More>