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Great things have come from Quirky and its community of inventors. but their biggest project, Aros, strained everyone.
Garthen Leslie is an IT consultant and looks the part. He’s geeky, quiet, and middle-aged, sporting a long, untucked white polo, khakis, and wire-framed glasses. But today, very suddenly, he is also the face of a new ideal—a symbol of how invention itself is being reinvented.
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Great things have come from Quirky and its community of inventors. but their biggest project, Aros, strained everyone.

Garthen Leslie is an IT consultant and looks the part. He’s geeky, quiet, and middle-aged, sporting a long, untucked white polo, khakis, and wire-framed glasses. But today, very suddenly, he is also the face of a new ideal—a symbol of how invention itself is being reinvented.

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Groupthink can set in for new employees in mere days—which is why you should ask them on Day One what’s wrong with your company.
When something isn’t working out quite right, CEOs are often the last to know. But not at Emerald Therapeutics.
The biotech startup tasks all new hires with an unusual mandate: each new employee must fill out a “fresh-eye journal” criticizing and analyzing all aspects of the company. Newcomers are asked questions like “Describe a decision that the company has made that raises an eyebrow for you?” And their feedback is read by company co-CEOS Brian Frezza and D.J. Kleinbaum.
Frezza and Kleinbaum say they came up with the idea a year ago to help their startup avoid the trappings of corporate dysfunction and groupthink. After all, they founded Emerald with the idea of taking advantage of such weaknesses in the biotech industry.
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Groupthink can set in for new employees in mere days—which is why you should ask them on Day One what’s wrong with your company.

When something isn’t working out quite right, CEOs are often the last to know. But not at Emerald Therapeutics.

The biotech startup tasks all new hires with an unusual mandate: each new employee must fill out a “fresh-eye journal” criticizing and analyzing all aspects of the company. Newcomers are asked questions like “Describe a decision that the company has made that raises an eyebrow for you?” And their feedback is read by company co-CEOS Brian Frezza and D.J. Kleinbaum.

Frezza and Kleinbaum say they came up with the idea a year ago to help their startup avoid the trappings of corporate dysfunction and groupthink. After all, they founded Emerald with the idea of taking advantage of such weaknesses in the biotech industry.

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Nearly 90 of jobs demand social media skills, but it turns out just hiring Millennials isn’t the answer.
In all the talk about the tech about the mismatch between the projected number of STEM jobs (1.2 million new ones in the next six years) and the U.S.-based talent to fill those positions, we’re losing sight of another big skills gap that’s right under our fingers every day.
Ninety percent of all jobs in the next year will require information and communication technology skills, according to research by Capgemini. Yet more than half the companies polled lacked social media skills. That’s despite a McKinsey report that projects social media adding up to $1.3 trillion to our economy. No wonder the gap is poised to create a war for talent that quietly rivals the battle playing out amid the startups of Silicon Valley.
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Nearly 90 of jobs demand social media skills, but it turns out just hiring Millennials isn’t the answer.

In all the talk about the tech about the mismatch between the projected number of STEM jobs (1.2 million new ones in the next six years) and the U.S.-based talent to fill those positions, we’re losing sight of another big skills gap that’s right under our fingers every day.

Ninety percent of all jobs in the next year will require information and communication technology skills, according to research by Capgemini. Yet more than half the companies polled lacked social media skills. That’s despite a McKinsey report that projects social media adding up to $1.3 trillion to our economy. No wonder the gap is poised to create a war for talent that quietly rivals the battle playing out amid the startups of Silicon Valley.

Read More>