FastCompany Magazine

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What happens when brands adopt a technology before most people have a chance to play with it? That’s what’s happening now with Oculus Rift, which has become the new plaything of brands eager to show off their cool factor—but it means that, for most people, their first experience with the virtual reality goggles will be as a thing that shows them advertising.

Is that a bad thing? Fast Company senior editor Jason Feifer argues yes, and he has a message for brands: back off! Watch the video to see why.

Do you agree, or are you excited when brands jump in on new experiences? Either way, tell us by tweeting with the hashtag #brandsbrandsbrands.

Apple Introduces “5K” Retina iMac With 14.7 Million Pixels
The iMac didn’t really get its due at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this summer. With all the fanfare focused on software, Apple rolled out incremental changes and price cuts for its iMac line. On Thursday, the company pulled the focus back to its desktop computers, showing off new iMacs with high-resolution “5K” displays and updating the oft-overlooked Mac Mini with faster processor and graphics.
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Apple Introduces “5K” Retina iMac With 14.7 Million Pixels

The iMac didn’t really get its due at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this summer. With all the fanfare focused on software, Apple rolled out incremental changes and price cuts for its iMac line. On Thursday, the company pulled the focus back to its desktop computers, showing off new iMacs with high-resolution “5K” displays and updating the oft-overlooked Mac Mini with faster processor and graphics.

Read More>

hannahteak:

The amazing view from @fastcompany HQ. Thanks for having me! 

The pleasure was ours!
You can read last week’s Q&A with creative director of Purpose, Hannah Kreiswirth, here.

hannahteak:

The amazing view from @fastcompany HQ. Thanks for having me! 

The pleasure was ours!

You can read last week’s Q&A with creative director of Purpose, Hannah Kreiswirth, here.

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When the first astronauts landed on the moon, they used rakes to dig up rocks for research. Since then scientists have had to find ways to get planetary dirt samples without manpower. The engineers at Honeybee Robotics believe they’ve found a way—and it’s simpler than you’d think. Watch the video above to see how it works

mashable:

The aptly-named Air Umbrella is a rod-shaped device with a motor, rechargeable lithium battery and fan blade. The device takes in air below the fan blade and forces it out in such a manner that falling rain gets redirected

[via]

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Steves Jobs and Wozniak lived the original Silicon Valley creation myth when they built the first Apple computer—basically a funky circuit board encased in wood—at Jobs’s parent’s house in Cupertino in 1976. In this week’s Brand Evolution, see how they went from geeky garage dwellers to creating the most successful tech company in the world.