FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

With the launch of a new version of the venerable role-playing game, D&D is on a quest to dominate your leisure time with digital weapons.
A party of adventurers sneak their way through Cragmaw Cave to surprise a clutch of goblins and their pet wolves.
As the bloody battle wages on, bodies fall one by one. The Dwarven priest and the vicious leader Klarg are all that remain standing. The duel rages on and only one can emerge victorious. A player tosses his dice eagerly to see if he can roll that critical hit and win the day.
This could be a scene from 1970s or the 1990s or today, from the first version of Dungeons and Dragons, to the second edition or third or fourth. But this scene unfolds in the latest D&D release and it comes with one big, modern difference: the players themselves had a hand in shaping the rules. It is all part of D&D publisher Wizards of the Coast’s embrace of the online world and digital lives of those who play this iconic paper-and-pen-based game.
"The rules provide the engine for great adventures and our focus shifts squarely to creating the best stories for players to share and enjoy in their preferred format," says Nathan Stewart, brand director for Dungeons and Dragons.

The latest version, simply titled Dungeons and Dragons, debuted last week with the release of the “Starter Set,” a box that comes with a 32-page primer on the new rules, a 64-page adventure, five characters for players to use on said adventure, and a set of dice to actually play the game with. It is a preview of the new game, before the full rulebooks are released later this year: the Player’s Handbook in August, theMonster Manual in September, and the Dungeon Master’s Guidetwo months later. Getting to this point was, as any avid D&D player might guess, an epic undertaking.
Read More>

With the launch of a new version of the venerable role-playing game, D&D is on a quest to dominate your leisure time with digital weapons.

A party of adventurers sneak their way through Cragmaw Cave to surprise a clutch of goblins and their pet wolves.

As the bloody battle wages on, bodies fall one by one. The Dwarven priest and the vicious leader Klarg are all that remain standing. The duel rages on and only one can emerge victorious. A player tosses his dice eagerly to see if he can roll that critical hit and win the day.

This could be a scene from 1970s or the 1990s or today, from the first version of Dungeons and Dragons, to the second edition or third or fourth. But this scene unfolds in the latest D&D release and it comes with one big, modern difference: the players themselves had a hand in shaping the rules. It is all part of D&D publisher Wizards of the Coast’s embrace of the online world and digital lives of those who play this iconic paper-and-pen-based game.

"The rules provide the engine for great adventures and our focus shifts squarely to creating the best stories for players to share and enjoy in their preferred format," says Nathan Stewart, brand director for Dungeons and Dragons.

The latest version, simply titled Dungeons and Dragons, debuted last week with the release of the “Starter Set,” a box that comes with a 32-page primer on the new rules, a 64-page adventure, five characters for players to use on said adventure, and a set of dice to actually play the game with. It is a preview of the new game, before the full rulebooks are released later this year: the Player’s Handbook in August, theMonster Manual in September, and the Dungeon Master’s Guidetwo months later. Getting to this point was, as any avid D&D player might guess, an epic undertaking.

Read More>

  1. teatimeposts reblogged this from fastcompany
  2. trustmehesadoctor reblogged this from iron-inquisitor
  3. thelonearcanist reblogged this from polyhedral-paranoia and added:
    Honestly I’m far too invested in Pathfinder to be bothered with the new edition of DnD, if I’m going to throw down the...
  4. polyhedral-paranoia reblogged this from rpgwizzard and added:
    I wish the new DnD system wasn’t total shit
  5. rpgwizzard reblogged this from nat1blogging
  6. iron-inquisitor reblogged this from typhoonwizard
  7. typhoonwizard reblogged this from nat1blogging
  8. crowcockatiel reblogged this from fastcompany
  9. alexmorado reblogged this from fastcompany
  10. belkeris reblogged this from nat1blogging
  11. nat1blogging reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    'Just as in the way the playtest documents evolved over the months, so will the “Basic Rules.” It is tagged as version...
  12. michaelmentz reblogged this from fastcompany
  13. scream-thebridge-andcry-theverse reblogged this from fastcompany
  14. sit-on-the-grass reblogged this from fastcompany
  15. hansbuetow reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    Just came from a lunchtime meeting with a colleague to plan our office game. I’m excited about the possibilities of...
  16. alaricbaez reblogged this from fastcompany
  17. clazzjassicalrockhop reblogged this from fastcompany
  18. xwhenthefirediesx reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    this is wonderful
  19. kijikmultimedia reblogged this from fastcompany
  20. kgdelrey reblogged this from fastcompany
  21. littlegizmo76 reblogged this from fastcompany