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And what will bubblegum princesses wear on flights from L.A. to Puerto Vallarta now that the velour tracksuit brand is gone?
Last week, Juicy Couture announced it will be closing all U.S. stores by the end of June, Racked reported.
For those for whom a little silver J on a zipper symbolized bitchy popular-girl oppression in middle school—a sign to run as fast as your dorky Keds could carry you—the announcement might bring a kind of vindication, a sweet relief. The reign of the velour tracksuit has ended. The brand’s downfall is a cautionary tale to businesses and fashion designers: creating one year’s hottest trend doesn’t necessarily guarantee a brand’s longevity.

Ten years ago, Juicy was the unofficial sponsor of the Mystic-tanned Hollywood set and their plasticky emulators in high schools around the country (as 2004’s Mean Girls satirized). The brand was best known for velour tracksuits in cotton candy pinks and blues with “JUICY” stamped in rhinestones on the backside (especially troubling when worn by 11-year-olds). Paired with Uggs and Northface jackets, these sweats became a lazy-chic celebutante uniform, beloved by the likes of Paris Hilton, Kim Kardashian, Jessica Simpson, and Eva Longoria (in real life and in character on Desperate Housewives). In 2003, the New York Times reported that Juicy had been “built from a $200 start-up to a $51 million concern.”
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fastcodesign:

And what will bubblegum princesses wear on flights from L.A. to Puerto Vallarta now that the velour tracksuit brand is gone?

Last week, Juicy Couture announced it will be closing all U.S. stores by the end of June, Racked reported.

For those for whom a little silver J on a zipper symbolized bitchy popular-girl oppression in middle school—a sign to run as fast as your dorky Keds could carry you—the announcement might bring a kind of vindication, a sweet relief. The reign of the velour tracksuit has ended. The brand’s downfall is a cautionary tale to businesses and fashion designers: creating one year’s hottest trend doesn’t necessarily guarantee a brand’s longevity.

image

Ten years ago, Juicy was the unofficial sponsor of the Mystic-tanned Hollywood set and their plasticky emulators in high schools around the country (as 2004’s Mean Girls satirized). The brand was best known for velour tracksuits in cotton candy pinks and blues with “JUICY” stamped in rhinestones on the backside (especially troubling when worn by 11-year-olds). Paired with Uggs and Northface jackets, these sweats became a lazy-chic celebutante uniform, beloved by the likes of Paris Hilton, Kim Kardashian, Jessica Simpson, and Eva Longoria (in real life and in character on Desperate Housewives). In 2003, the New York Times reported that Juicy had been “built from a $200 start-up to a $51 million concern.”

Read More>

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  8. georgevaldes reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    Good riddance. Although they’ll probably fashionable again in 5-10yrs
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  11. twatsorcery reblogged this from frizzbizz and added:
    BERTRAND NOOOOOOOOOOO
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