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China is launching its very own space station. Countries have achieved such a feet absent international cooperation  only twice before—Russia’s Salyut, in 1971, and the United States’  Skylab, in 1973. After successful manned space flights and a robotic lunar lander,  a space station would be a potent political symbol in an era when the  U.S. has no means to get astronauts into space other than paying the  Russians.
The thing about China—a nation led by engineers—is that through the  vehicle of its 5-year plans, its government methodically pursues its  stated goals. It’s happened before in microchips, leading the Chinese  government to develop a home-grown processor that may some day challenge Intel. And it’s happening in space.

What China’s New Space Station Means For The World

China is launching its very own space station. Countries have achieved such a feet absent international cooperation only twice before—Russia’s Salyut, in 1971, and the United States’ Skylab, in 1973. After successful manned space flights and a robotic lunar lander, a space station would be a potent political symbol in an era when the U.S. has no means to get astronauts into space other than paying the Russians.

The thing about China—a nation led by engineers—is that through the vehicle of its 5-year plans, its government methodically pursues its stated goals. It’s happened before in microchips, leading the Chinese government to develop a home-grown processor that may some day challenge Intel. And it’s happening in space.

What China’s New Space Station Means For The World