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In If The Imposter Syndrome Is Undermining Your Leadership Role, Tackle It Head On, business assessment pro Julie Moreland breaks down the common work-place inferiority complex known as The Imposter Syndrome.
Symptoms:
Difficulty accepting praise as being genuine
Feeling that peers with the same responsibilities are somehow more qualified or better at their jobs
Afraid of new responsibilities or challenges because they’re afraid of failure
Abnormal reaction to constructive criticism
Anxiety over others “seeing through” their lack of ability

If you’re feeling like an imposter in your business role, don’t push the panic button, because you’re far from alone. Dr. Gail Matthews from the Dominican College in California estimates that approximately 70% of all people have suffered from it at one time or another in their careers.

Here are a few suggestions to help you overcome your insecurities:
Be AwareWhen you can identify when your Imposter Syndrome is sneaking into your thoughts and actions, try to keep track of what triggers them—and learn to quickly identify them as not being based in reality.
Rethink Your DoubtsTry to rewrite your internal negative narratives by reminding yourself that you’re handling the job well and that, as the old saying goes, nobody’s perfect.
Discuss Your DoubtsFind trusted co-workers or business associates (or even a therapist) with whom you feel you can share your inner downer dialogues; they can help you work through them (and it’s always best to drag these beasts out into the daylight).
Look Forward, Not BackwardInstead of dwelling on a situation that turned out badly, think about how to do things differently if you’re ever faced with it again. Focus on positive future changes rather than past negatives.
Be Nice to YourselfIf you are plagued by feelings of being an imposter, you probably have a mindset in which you’re giving everyone around you the benefit of the doubt (or even assuming that they’re better than they are). Try to give yourself the same leeway and be nice to yourself, even when you screw up. Better yet, reward yourself when you get something really right! 
[Image: Mike Flippo via Shutterstock]

In If The Imposter Syndrome Is Undermining Your Leadership Role, Tackle It Head Onbusiness assessment pro Julie Moreland breaks down the common work-place inferiority complex known as The Imposter Syndrome.

Symptoms:

  • Difficulty accepting praise as being genuine
  • Feeling that peers with the same responsibilities are somehow more qualified or better at their jobs
  • Afraid of new responsibilities or challenges because they’re afraid of failure
  • Abnormal reaction to constructive criticism
  • Anxiety over others “seeing through” their lack of ability

If you’re feeling like an imposter in your business role, don’t push the panic button, because you’re far from alone. Dr. Gail Matthews from the Dominican College in California estimates that approximately 70% of all people have suffered from it at one time or another in their careers.

Here are a few suggestions to help you overcome your insecurities:

Be Aware
When you can identify when your Imposter Syndrome is sneaking into your thoughts and actions, try to keep track of what triggers them—and learn to quickly identify them as not being based in reality.

Rethink Your Doubts
Try to rewrite your internal negative narratives by reminding yourself that you’re handling the job well and that, as the old saying goes, nobody’s perfect.

Discuss Your Doubts
Find trusted co-workers or business associates (or even a therapist) with whom you feel you can share your inner downer dialogues; they can help you work through them (and it’s always best to drag these beasts out into the daylight).

Look Forward, Not Backward
Instead of dwelling on a situation that turned out badly, think about how to do things differently if you’re ever faced with it again. Focus on positive future changes rather than past negatives.

Be Nice to Yourself
If you are plagued by feelings of being an imposter, you probably have a mindset in which you’re giving everyone around you the benefit of the doubt (or even assuming that they’re better than they are). Try to give yourself the same leeway and be nice to yourself, even when you screw up. Better yet, reward yourself when you get something really right! 

[Image: Mike Flippo via Shutterstock]

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    Essential reading.
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