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Paper can be used for lots of things! Writing notes to boys you like in class. Making different kinds of airplanes for the laziest science project in the world. Crafting signs to remind yourself to shut off your space heater before you leave for work (seriously!!). And now, decorative vases:


If not for the headline here, you’d be forgiven for mistaking Siba Sahabi's papercraft for the work of an expert potter. Sahabi, a Holland-based German-Iranian designer, is a master illusionist, transforming strips of paper into stunning little vases that would look perfectly at home in the Greek wing at the Met.
Her latest collection, Kerameikos, shown in the slideshow above and opening at Internationale Handwerksmesse in Munich next week, takes inspiration from an ancient potter’s quarter in Athens of the same name. (The English word “ceramics” derives from Kerameikos.)
She replicated the textured look of pottery by meticulously cutting and folding paper into long strips, then coiling them into circles like a snake. Each vase took an average of three days.
A companion piece to earlier projects that simulated everything fromEtruscan ceramics to Moroccan tea sets, Kerameikos hints at a larger theme in Sahabi’s oeuvre: that of using tableware as a window onto different cultures. As she writes on her website: “My aim is to translate culture into objects; I want to build a bridge between the orient and the occident.”



More photos when you click through.

Paper can be used for lots of things! Writing notes to boys you like in class. Making different kinds of airplanes for the laziest science project in the world. Crafting signs to remind yourself to shut off your space heater before you leave for work (seriously!!). And now, decorative vases:

If not for the headline here, you’d be forgiven for mistaking Siba Sahabi's papercraft for the work of an expert potter. Sahabi, a Holland-based German-Iranian designer, is a master illusionist, transforming strips of paper into stunning little vases that would look perfectly at home in the Greek wing at the Met.

Her latest collection, Kerameikos, shown in the slideshow above and opening at Internationale Handwerksmesse in Munich next week, takes inspiration from an ancient potter’s quarter in Athens of the same name. (The English word “ceramics” derives from Kerameikos.)

She replicated the textured look of pottery by meticulously cutting and folding paper into long strips, then coiling them into circles like a snake. Each vase took an average of three days.

A companion piece to earlier projects that simulated everything fromEtruscan ceramics to Moroccan tea setsKerameikos hints at a larger theme in Sahabi’s oeuvre: that of using tableware as a window onto different cultures. As she writes on her website: “My aim is to translate culture into objects; I want to build a bridge between the orient and the occident.”

More photos when you click through.

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