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Oscar weekend! Ooooooo. Over at FC.com, we’ve awarded our own Oscars—for innovation! Innovation like HOW, you ask?

Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky's first cinematic innovation was a title. His low-budget indie was named simply, with a symbol, π. The film also asked a question dear to business innovators everywhere: Can you predict the stock market through numerology? Later films employed further innovations; for 2006's The Fountain, Aronofsky hired a specialist in macro photography to film microorganisms, using the resulting footage for the movie’s trippy visual effects. With Black Swan, Aronovsky has entered the mainstream, deploying his own form of indie dread on a wider audience. As with The Fountain, if there is a filmmaking innovation in Black Swan, it may be in restraint rather than excess. The film’s special effects are often extremely subtle—a painting seems to move, just for an instant; a tattoo squirms just a bit more than a muscle movement would account for—causing the audience members to question their own sanity at the same moment that Natalie Portman’s character questions hers.

And more! Click through to find out. If you’ve read Bazin’s What Is Cinema?, keep it to yourself. We are all about the glitz.

Oscar weekend! Ooooooo. Over at FC.com, we’ve awarded our own Oscars—for innovation! Innovation like HOW, you ask?

Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky's first cinematic innovation was a title. His low-budget indie was named simply, with a symbol, π. The film also asked a question dear to business innovators everywhere: Can you predict the stock market through numerology? Later films employed further innovations; for 2006's The Fountain, Aronofsky hired a specialist in macro photography to film microorganisms, using the resulting footage for the movie’s trippy visual effects. With Black Swan, Aronovsky has entered the mainstream, deploying his own form of indie dread on a wider audience. As with The Fountain, if there is a filmmaking innovation in Black Swan, it may be in restraint rather than excess. The film’s special effects are often extremely subtle—a painting seems to move, just for an instant; a tattoo squirms just a bit more than a muscle movement would account for—causing the audience members to question their own sanity at the same moment that Natalie Portman’s character questions hers.

And more! Click through to find out. If you’ve read Bazin’s What Is Cinema?, keep it to yourself. We are all about the glitz.

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