FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Have you guys ever tried spam? It’s seriously the most underrated meat—like ham, but with twice the salt, fat and trimmings. Eating one can is like washing your face in a McDonald’s deep fryer. But if you cook it up with some fried rice, mm-mmm! College kids’ delight. But aside from that, here’s a very interesting look at the business of spam, the e-mail. Yeah, I was disappointed too.


"If you received an unsolicited email in the past few years pimping male enhancement or erectile dysfunction pills, chances are extremely good that it was sent compliments of a Glavmed/Spamit contractor," writes Krebs. According to his post, GlavMed ran as the legitimate front company for an invitation-only group of mass emailers that processed over 1.5 million orders of pills from 800,000 (hopefully happy) customers over a three-year period. Members, or, “affiliates,” “were given a handful of pre-fabricated pharmacy website templates,” earning a hefty 40% in of all sales generated from their sites. Data from (the conspicuously titled) SpamIt.com reveals that 8 of the 10 top moneymakers earned more than a $1 million dollars in commission. A sophisticated user interface accompanied the sale logs, complete with graphic art, drop down menus, and convenient tab layout for switching between “orders” and “referred URLs.”
Most affiliates were paid in “Webmoney, a virtual currency popular in Russia that is similar to PayPal,” writes Kreb, “except that transactions are largely irreversible.” The reminder was payed in ePassporte virtual currency, which was shuttered in September in 2010 “amid allegations of fraud and misappropriation of funds.”


Not to judge, but if you run a website that generates spam, you are wasting your potential. You’re on like, level two of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. You breathe and eat and that is your life.

Have you guys ever tried spam? It’s seriously the most underrated meat—like ham, but with twice the salt, fat and trimmings. Eating one can is like washing your face in a McDonald’s deep fryer. But if you cook it up with some fried rice, mm-mmm! College kids’ delight. But aside from that, here’s a very interesting look at the business of spam, the e-mail. Yeah, I was disappointed too.

"If you received an unsolicited email in the past few years pimping male enhancement or erectile dysfunction pills, chances are extremely good that it was sent compliments of a Glavmed/Spamit contractor," writes Krebs. According to his post, GlavMed ran as the legitimate front company for an invitation-only group of mass emailers that processed over 1.5 million orders of pills from 800,000 (hopefully happy) customers over a three-year period. Members, or, “affiliates,” “were given a handful of pre-fabricated pharmacy website templates,” earning a hefty 40% in of all sales generated from their sites. Data from (the conspicuously titled) SpamIt.com reveals that 8 of the 10 top moneymakers earned more than a $1 million dollars in commission. A sophisticated user interface accompanied the sale logs, complete with graphic art, drop down menus, and convenient tab layout for switching between “orders” and “referred URLs.”

Most affiliates were paid in “Webmoney, a virtual currency popular in Russia that is similar to PayPal,” writes Kreb, “except that transactions are largely irreversible.” The reminder was payed in ePassporte virtual currency, which was shuttered in September in 2010 “amid allegations of fraud and misappropriation of funds.”

Not to judge, but if you run a website that generates spam, you are wasting your potential. You’re on like, level two of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. You breathe and eat and that is your life.