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Haha, come on. If you wouldn’t want to be Facebook friends with Charles Manson, you are letting the terrorists win.


Last month, Manson was caught with a cell phone in his prison cell. Actually, it was his second such offense. In 2009, according to the AP, Manson became “an unlikely face of the prison cell phone problem,” after guards discovered a hidden cell phone the killer had been using to call and text people in California, Florida, New Jersey, and British Columbia. (Manson had missed calls from Arkansas, Indiana, and Massachusetts—a popular guy, still, after 40 years in prison.)
Unauthorized cell phones have been proliferating behind bars, and increasingly smartphones are entering the mix—“the most lethal weapon you can get inside a prison,” to hear Terry Bittner of the ITT Corporation tell it to the New York Times. That might not be hyperbole: Officials claim that some convicts are using them to continue their illegal activities from jail. Now California and other states are scrambling to find technology to help detect and disable this “most lethal weapon” in our nation’s prisons—and to keep Charles Manson from friending you on Facebook.



There’s other good stuff if you click through, but honestly, California is being a real drag on this. A social networking serial killer is so post-culture it hurts.

Haha, come on. If you wouldn’t want to be Facebook friends with Charles Manson, you are letting the terrorists win.

Last month, Manson was caught with a cell phone in his prison cell. Actually, it was his second such offense. In 2009, according to the AP, Manson became “an unlikely face of the prison cell phone problem,” after guards discovered a hidden cell phone the killer had been using to call and text people in California, Florida, New Jersey, and British Columbia. (Manson had missed calls from Arkansas, Indiana, and Massachusetts—a popular guy, still, after 40 years in prison.)

Unauthorized cell phones have been proliferating behind bars, and increasingly smartphones are entering the mix—“the most lethal weapon you can get inside a prison,” to hear Terry Bittner of the ITT Corporation tell it to the New York Times. That might not be hyperbole: Officials claim that some convicts are using them to continue their illegal activities from jail. Now California and other states are scrambling to find technology to help detect and disable this “most lethal weapon” in our nation’s prisons—and to keep Charles Manson from friending you on Facebook.

There’s other good stuff if you click through, but honestly, California is being a real drag on this. A social networking serial killer is so post-culture it hurts.

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