FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Super Bowl Ad Stories: “The Remake,” Featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard
When it comes to the Super Bowl, advertising agencies can spend months  brainstorming the perfect ad. For Euro RSCG Chicago’s chief creative  officer Jason Peterson, who’s produced four spots for the big game, that  means concepting as many as 60 commercial ideas before finding the  right one.
"There are definitely a different set of parameters  for the Super Bowl—expectations are completely different," he says. "If  you don’t create a talked about, cultural hit, then it’s a waste of $3  million."
Peterson says he and his team start with a basic wish list of ideas.  “When we sit down to write Super Bowl commercials, we write down three  things,” he says. “The first one being monkeys; the second being getting  kicked in the nuts; and maybe the third is some outrageous use of the  product, a catchphrase line, or one of those clichés, like putting a  baby in the commercial.”
The ad man is only half-joking. Year and year, commercials are filled  with monkeys, crotch-kicks, and talking babies. Why? Because they work.  (Read: eTrade baby.) These themes have a long history of success, so why not recycle them for contemporary ads?
For Peterson’s spot last year he followed a similar model, using an  archetype that’s worked magic in Super Bowl after Super Bowl: The  Remake.
Taking a classic commercial and refashioning it for a modern audience is  a sure way to find success. After creating an all-time hit with Cindy  Crawford’s 1992 ad, for example, Pepsi reintroduced the ad years later,  playing off nostalgia for the original—with an updated punch-line.
Click through to see original spots and their remakes, including the classic Michael Jordan and Larry Bird McDonald’s spot remake featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard.
Related: If you like seeing remakes, check out this series by Kirby Ferguson in which he explores the concept of how Everything is a Remix.

Super Bowl Ad Stories: “The Remake,” Featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard

When it comes to the Super Bowl, advertising agencies can spend months brainstorming the perfect ad. For Euro RSCG Chicago’s chief creative officer Jason Peterson, who’s produced four spots for the big game, that means concepting as many as 60 commercial ideas before finding the right one.

"There are definitely a different set of parameters for the Super Bowl—expectations are completely different," he says. "If you don’t create a talked about, cultural hit, then it’s a waste of $3 million."

Peterson says he and his team start with a basic wish list of ideas. “When we sit down to write Super Bowl commercials, we write down three things,” he says. “The first one being monkeys; the second being getting kicked in the nuts; and maybe the third is some outrageous use of the product, a catchphrase line, or one of those clichés, like putting a baby in the commercial.”

The ad man is only half-joking. Year and year, commercials are filled with monkeys, crotch-kicks, and talking babies. Why? Because they work. (Read: eTrade baby.) These themes have a long history of success, so why not recycle them for contemporary ads?

For Peterson’s spot last year he followed a similar model, using an archetype that’s worked magic in Super Bowl after Super Bowl: The Remake.

Taking a classic commercial and refashioning it for a modern audience is a sure way to find success. After creating an all-time hit with Cindy Crawford’s 1992 ad, for example, Pepsi reintroduced the ad years later, playing off nostalgia for the original—with an updated punch-line.

Click through to see original spots and their remakes, including the classic Michael Jordan and Larry Bird McDonald’s spot remake featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard.

Related: If you like seeing remakes, check out this series by Kirby Ferguson in which he explores the concept of how Everything is a Remix.

  1. fastcompany posted this