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The new set for Piers Morgan Tonight is simply gorgeous. Emmy award-winning set designer Jim Fenhagen is the man behind the architecture:

…Fenhagen turned to the major design challenge — -creating a setting for  an interview show where 90% of the camera angles will be on the  subjects’ faces. King’s set featured little dots. Fenhagen wanted  something fresher, brighter, something that spoke to a more digital age.  And he wanted it to be colorful.
"Jonathan Wald (the show’s producer) and I are both big fans of  classical modern design," Fenhagen says. "We used to go over to the Lever House for lunch.” Wald mentioned a particular Mondrian that he liked, “Broadway Boogie Woogie,”  that was inspired by jazz music and the energy of New York.  Fenhagen  started to play with that, adding dimension to the matrix of lines and  colors, mixing white squares with a blue background. Along the way, he  discovered if he put glass in front of an LED light, it turned the light  into a Mondrian-like square. It was genius! He started building layers  from that, placing color where he wanted it, integrating it with graphic  animation.

We’ll all miss Larry King (and his many dots), but this set design definitely trumps King’s old digs.

The new set for Piers Morgan Tonight is simply gorgeous. Emmy award-winning set designer Jim Fenhagen is the man behind the architecture:

…Fenhagen turned to the major design challenge — -creating a setting for an interview show where 90% of the camera angles will be on the subjects’ faces. King’s set featured little dots. Fenhagen wanted something fresher, brighter, something that spoke to a more digital age. And he wanted it to be colorful.

"Jonathan Wald (the show’s producer) and I are both big fans of classical modern design," Fenhagen says. "We used to go over to the Lever House for lunch.” Wald mentioned a particular Mondrian that he liked, “Broadway Boogie Woogie,” that was inspired by jazz music and the energy of New York. Fenhagen started to play with that, adding dimension to the matrix of lines and colors, mixing white squares with a blue background. Along the way, he discovered if he put glass in front of an LED light, it turned the light into a Mondrian-like square. It was genius! He started building layers from that, placing color where he wanted it, integrating it with graphic animation.

We’ll all miss Larry King (and his many dots), but this set design definitely trumps King’s old digs.

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