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Uh oh! According to some researchers at Ohio State University, the common bedbug has caught onto the whole pesticide thing, and he is NOT impressed:

 
"The insecticides being used right now are based on the idea that resistance in bedbugs is caused by point mutations in genes," explained Omprakash Mittapalli, corresponding author of the study, in a statement. “But we are finding out that the mode of resistance could be attributed to a combination of changes in the bug’s genetic makeup (such as mutations) as well as transcriptomic adjustments leading to differential gene expression. Pinpointing such defense mechanisms and the associated genes could lead to the development of novel methods of control that are more effective.” Other genetic changes could be giving the pests sturdier exoskeletons that are more resistant to pesticide penetration.

Translation: Bedbugs are adapting to our pesticides in ways we’d never considered before, and as a result, no one will ever sleep again.
But don’t worry! Possible solutions include: throwing out your furniture, moving to the countryside, renting Joe’s Apartment for advice on how to live with your new insect overlords, huddling in a corner and sobbing until you fall asleep (every night, for the next twenty years). Alternately, you can just leave that ratty old recliner out in the alley where it belongs. 

Uh oh! According to some researchers at Ohio State University, the common bedbug has caught onto the whole pesticide thing, and he is NOT impressed:

"The insecticides being used right now are based on the idea that resistance in bedbugs is caused by point mutations in genes," explained Omprakash Mittapalli, corresponding author of the study, in a statement. “But we are finding out that the mode of resistance could be attributed to a combination of changes in the bug’s genetic makeup (such as mutations) as well as transcriptomic adjustments leading to differential gene expression. Pinpointing such defense mechanisms and the associated genes could lead to the development of novel methods of control that are more effective.” Other genetic changes could be giving the pests sturdier exoskeletons that are more resistant to pesticide penetration.

Translation: Bedbugs are adapting to our pesticides in ways we’d never considered before, and as a result, no one will ever sleep again.

But don’t worry! Possible solutions include: throwing out your furniture, moving to the countryside, renting Joe’s Apartment for advice on how to live with your new insect overlords, huddling in a corner and sobbing until you fall asleep (every night, for the next twenty years). Alternately, you can just leave that ratty old recliner out in the alley where it belongs. 

  1. osubuckeyes reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    Do you think bed bugs like to wear Ohio State apparel?
  2. quebella reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    Gross Bedbugs!
  3. fastcompany posted this