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longreads:

The power of habits in guiding our behavior—and how companies like Target have used customer data to create new buying habits:

There are, however, some brief periods in a person’s life when old routines fall apart and buying habits are suddenly in flux. One of those moments — the moment, really — is right around the birth of a child, when parents are exhausted and overwhelmed and their shopping patterns and brand loyalties are up for grabs. But as Target’s marketers explained to Pole, timing is everything. Because birth records are usually public, the moment a couple have a new baby, they are almost instantaneously barraged with offers and incentives and advertisements from all sorts of companies. Which means that the key is to reach them earlier, before any other retailers know a baby is on the way. Specifically, the marketers said they wanted to send specially designed ads to women in their second trimester, which is when most expectant mothers begin buying all sorts of new things, like prenatal vitamins and maternity clothing. ‘Can you give us a list?’ the marketers asked.

“How Companies Learn Your Secrets.” — Charles Duhigg, New York Times
See more #longreads from Charles Duhigg

longreads:

The power of habits in guiding our behavior—and how companies like Target have used customer data to create new buying habits:

There are, however, some brief periods in a person’s life when old routines fall apart and buying habits are suddenly in flux. One of those moments — the moment, really — is right around the birth of a child, when parents are exhausted and overwhelmed and their shopping patterns and brand loyalties are up for grabs. But as Target’s marketers explained to Pole, timing is everything. Because birth records are usually public, the moment a couple have a new baby, they are almost instantaneously barraged with offers and incentives and advertisements from all sorts of companies. Which means that the key is to reach them earlier, before any other retailers know a baby is on the way. Specifically, the marketers said they wanted to send specially designed ads to women in their second trimester, which is when most expectant mothers begin buying all sorts of new things, like prenatal vitamins and maternity clothing. ‘Can you give us a list?’ the marketers asked.

“How Companies Learn Your Secrets.” — Charles Duhigg, New York Times

See more #longreads from Charles Duhigg

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    aka creepy capitalist shit
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    The statistician in me is giddy with excitement over the clever use of data while trying to not think about the...
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    That’s awesome.
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    Wow, this would have come in handy when I was writing my Strategic Memo analysis up a few days ago for my research...
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