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New Kindle Helps Readers Show Off By Shouting Title Of Book Loudly And Repeatedly 

It’s easy to build something that’s more powerful than an iPad—and very, very hard to do it without introducing complexity.
Over at Medium, MG Siegler (parislemon) has a nice piece likening the iPad to a typewriter. He means the comparison to a defunct piece of technology as a compliment: Writing on an iPad with an external Logitech keyboard, he says, strips away all the distractions of other applications and web services and lets you focus on your thoughts and the words.
I know what he means. For almost three years now, I’ve used an iPad with a keyboard as my primary computer. About 85% of everything I’ve produced for publication in that time, I’ve pounded out on my tablet.
I like the fact that iPad apps run in full-screen mode and usually aren’t overwhelmed by interface clutter or features I’ll never use. I like the fact that I don’t have to spend much time maintaining my iPad, and don’t have to futz with stuff like anti-virus software. I like the fact that my iPad has built-in LTE wireless Internet which is (AT&T willing) available the moment I turn on the tablet. And I absolutely love the fact that I dependably get 10 hours of battery life on a charge, which means that I can be smugly productive while those who tote notebooks are frantically hunting for wall outlets.
In short, an iPad with a keyboard—my current fave is Belkin’s Qode Ultimate Keyboard case—is the closest thing I’ve found to the ideal general-purpose PC for me. I still run into folks who tell me I’m nuts, but there seem to be fewer hidebound naysayers than in the past. And more people like MG Siegler.
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It’s easy to build something that’s more powerful than an iPad—and very, very hard to do it without introducing complexity.

Over at Medium, MG Siegler (parislemon) has a nice piece likening the iPad to a typewriter. He means the comparison to a defunct piece of technology as a compliment: Writing on an iPad with an external Logitech keyboard, he says, strips away all the distractions of other applications and web services and lets you focus on your thoughts and the words.

I know what he means. For almost three years now, I’ve used an iPad with a keyboard as my primary computer. About 85% of everything I’ve produced for publication in that time, I’ve pounded out on my tablet.

I like the fact that iPad apps run in full-screen mode and usually aren’t overwhelmed by interface clutter or features I’ll never use. I like the fact that I don’t have to spend much time maintaining my iPad, and don’t have to futz with stuff like anti-virus software. I like the fact that my iPad has built-in LTE wireless Internet which is (AT&T willing) available the moment I turn on the tablet. And I absolutely love the fact that I dependably get 10 hours of battery life on a charge, which means that I can be smugly productive while those who tote notebooks are frantically hunting for wall outlets.

In short, an iPad with a keyboard—my current fave is Belkin’s Qode Ultimate Keyboard case—is the closest thing I’ve found to the ideal general-purpose PC for me. I still run into folks who tell me I’m nuts, but there seem to be fewer hidebound naysayers than in the past. And more people like MG Siegler.

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When you make a B movie, it’s best not to question the plot—no matter how ridiculous it is, advises Anthony C. Ferrante, the director of Sharknado, which debuted on Syfy last summer. “It bogs you down if you worry about that stuff,” Ferrante says, musing, “A sharknado can do whatever we tell it to do. It can tear through cars. It can go into the subway. And it doesn’t have to have a reason for anything. That’s the beauty of it. And once you accept it for what it is creatively as a director, you’re liberated because you’re not going, ‘Sharks in a tornado can’t really come into the city and do this!’” 
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When you make a B movie, it’s best not to question the plot—no matter how ridiculous it is, advises Anthony C. Ferrante, the director of Sharknado, which debuted on Syfy last summer. “It bogs you down if you worry about that stuff,” Ferrante says, musing, “A sharknado can do whatever we tell it to do. It can tear through cars. It can go into the subway. And it doesn’t have to have a reason for anything. That’s the beauty of it. And once you accept it for what it is creatively as a director, you’re liberated because you’re not going, ‘Sharks in a tornado can’t really come into the city and do this!’” 

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NPR (npr) One rethinks everything, even ditching the Like button.
Stark white and minimally designed, the new NPR One app looks like a paradigm of technology. But surprisingly, the app isn’t powered by algorithms, filters, or other pseudo-intelligence—it’s still good old human editor curation on the backend.
“For us, the algorithm that programs the app is very importantly focused on the human curation part of it,” says NPR VP of digital media Zach Brand. “A lot of people tend to think of it in terms of machine learning—which is a portion as well—but we have dedicated staff making sure that the most important stories are populated from the outset that represent the best experience right at the first moment. As we get to know the listener, it then tailors even more to them.”
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NPR (npr) One rethinks everything, even ditching the Like button.

Stark white and minimally designed, the new NPR One app looks like a paradigm of technology. But surprisingly, the app isn’t powered by algorithms, filters, or other pseudo-intelligence—it’s still good old human editor curation on the backend.

“For us, the algorithm that programs the app is very importantly focused on the human curation part of it,” says NPR VP of digital media Zach Brand. “A lot of people tend to think of it in terms of machine learning—which is a portion as well—but we have dedicated staff making sure that the most important stories are populated from the outset that represent the best experience right at the first moment. As we get to know the listener, it then tailors even more to them.”

Read More>