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Fast Company’s Harry McCracken and Alice Truong will report live from Apple’s product launch in Cupertino, California at 1pm ET. Among the rumored announcements: the iPhone 6 (possibly in 4.7” and 5.5” sizes) and the wearable device which everybody has been calling the iWatch.

It all comes down to this. After months of scuttlebutt and speculation, Apple will hold a press event at De Anza College’s Flint Center in its hometown of Cupertino—the same venue where Apple unveiled the first Mac over thirty years ago.
As usual, the company isn’t saying what it will announce, but current wisdom suggests Apple will show off new iPhones in two sizes—4.7” and 5.5”—and something wearable. What that wearable something will be remains murky; it would be a mistake to assume that it will be a watch, let alone be called the iWatch.
Technology Editor Harry McCracken and staff writer Alice Truong will be in Cupertino to provide live blog coverage of the news at it breaks, alongside color commentary from some Fast Company colleagues in New York. 
If the idea of networking makes you nauseous, you’re not alone—and science backs up your disgust.
According to research out of the University of Toronto, professional networking feels icky for good reason. Relationships formed based on a career need, rather than for sincere friendship, trigger our moral disgust—linked, in turn, to physical feelings of uncleanliness. The researchers theorized that this visceral reaction makes us network less frequently, and less effectively.
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If the idea of networking makes you nauseous, you’re not alone—and science backs up your disgust.

According to research out of the University of Toronto, professional networking feels icky for good reason. Relationships formed based on a career need, rather than for sincere friendship, trigger our moral disgust—linked, in turn, to physical feelings of uncleanliness. The researchers theorized that this visceral reaction makes us network less frequently, and less effectively.

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We’ve already heard that we need to embrace failure. Now here’s everything we need to know about what that actually means.
It seems like everywhere we turn we’re being told to “embrace failure.” From social media to countless business books and articles and the global failure conference FailCon, the importance of mistakes is lauded as a key stepping-stone for success.
Even advertisers are realizing the power of bragging about getting it wrong. For example, earlier this year Domino’s commercials touted that at their company “failure is an option” with a nod to its failed cookie pizza of 2007.
Despite all the failure-embracing saturation we’re seeing these days, this concept is nothing new. Iterations of “embrace failure” have existed long before the slogan was popular. Before the likes of Steve Jobs and Richard Branson told us to embrace failure, Michael Jordan told us that he fails over and over again. Before that Truman Capote said failure was “the condiment that gives success its flavor.” And before that James Joyce dubbed mistakes “portals of discovery.” Thomas Edison, Abraham Lincoln, Henry Ford—the list of innovators that used failure to get at their success goes on and on and on.
So why the apparent resurgence? More importantly, what does embracing failure really mean, does it work, and at what point is it too much?
In an effort to find the answers, we consulted a few experts who know a thing or two about failure.
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We’ve already heard that we need to embrace failure. Now here’s everything we need to know about what that actually means.

It seems like everywhere we turn we’re being told to “embrace failure.” From social media to countless business books and articles and the global failure conference FailCon, the importance of mistakes is lauded as a key stepping-stone for success.

Even advertisers are realizing the power of bragging about getting it wrong. For example, earlier this year Domino’s commercials touted that at their company “failure is an option” with a nod to its failed cookie pizza of 2007.

Despite all the failure-embracing saturation we’re seeing these days, this concept is nothing new. Iterations of “embrace failure” have existed long before the slogan was popular. Before the likes of Steve Jobs and Richard Branson told us to embrace failure, Michael Jordan told us that he fails over and over again. Before that Truman Capote said failure was “the condiment that gives success its flavor.” And before that James Joyce dubbed mistakes “portals of discovery.” Thomas Edison, Abraham Lincoln, Henry Ford—the list of innovators that used failure to get at their success goes on and on and on.

So why the apparent resurgence? More importantly, what does embracing failure really mean, does it work, and at what point is it too much?

In an effort to find the answers, we consulted a few experts who know a thing or two about failure.

Read More>

A healthier, brighter, more efficient world doesn’t just happen—it happens by design.
That’s proven by the finalists from our 2014 Innovation by Design competition, chosen from 1,587 boundary-pushing entries. All are listed here, and category winners will be announced at our conference in New York on October 15. 
Learn more at fastcodesign.com/ibd.

A healthier, brighter, more efficient world doesn’t just happen—it happens by design.

That’s proven by the finalists from our 2014 Innovation by Design competition, chosen from 1,587 boundary-pushing entries. All are listed here, and category winners will be announced at our conference in New York on October 15.

Learn more at fastcodesign.com/ibd.

“Tampon Run,” A Game From Two Teenagers Who Want You To Know That Periods Are Totally Normal
Two high school students have created a computer game that’s probably safe to say no game developer has ever bet money on before. There are no zombies, no AK-47s, no strippers. Instead, Tampon Run is a simple concept: Collect tampons, shoot them at your enemies, and don’t run out of them before your moon cycle is over.
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“Tampon Run,” A Game From Two Teenagers Who Want You To Know That Periods Are Totally Normal

Two high school students have created a computer game that’s probably safe to say no game developer has ever bet money on before. There are no zombies, no AK-47s, no strippers. Instead, Tampon Run is a simple concept: Collect tampons, shoot them at your enemies, and don’t run out of them before your moon cycle is over.

Read More>