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Drew Daywalt, author of the colorful children’s bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit, reveals how horror films inspire his work.

Daywalt’s Twitter bio provides more insight into his off-kilter sensibilities: “I grew up in a haunted house, reading Dr. Seuss.” Which might explain why, besides penning enormously popular children’s books, Daywalt also writes and directs horror films. That’s right, the author who’s become a literary darling among librarians and parents alike is also a slasher fanatic. “I want to be Willy Wonka,” Daywalt says. “He has a really fun spirited side but also a dark, justice-giver side.”
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Drew Daywalt, author of the colorful children’s bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit, reveals how horror films inspire his work.

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Daywalt’s Twitter bio provides more insight into his off-kilter sensibilities: “I grew up in a haunted house, reading Dr. Seuss.” Which might explain why, besides penning enormously popular children’s books, Daywalt also writes and directs horror films. That’s right, the author who’s become a literary darling among librarians and parents alike is also a slasher fanatic. “I want to be Willy Wonka,” Daywalt says. “He has a really fun spirited side but also a dark, justice-giver side.”

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3 Things That Turned This Photograph Into A Ferguson Icon

Cohen first noticed that the the man in his picture was wearing a shirt with an American flag down its front. It was too late to make the Post-Dispatch’s print edition the next day, but Lynden Steele, the Post-Dispatch’s director of photography, tweeted it out at 12:49 AM, Missouri time: “Wow… A man picks up burning tear gas can and throws it back at police,” Steele wrote. “And kept his chips,” another user noted three minutes later.

Read More>

3 Things That Turned This Photograph Into A Ferguson Icon

Cohen first noticed that the the man in his picture was wearing a shirt with an American flag down its front. It was too late to make the Post-Dispatch’s print edition the next day, but Lynden Steele, the Post-Dispatch’s director of photography, tweeted it out at 12:49 AM, Missouri time: “Wow… A man picks up burning tear gas can and throws it back at police,” Steele wrote. “And kept his chips,” another user noted three minutes later.

Read More>

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!!

What’s the world’s deadliest animal? 

(…besides humans, that is)

Biologists estimate that this animal has killed half of all humans that have ever lived, and today is responsible for more than 45 million years of lost human life annually. Chances are, you’ve been attacked by one.

Meet mankind’s most pesky foe in this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart, and find out why they prefer some prey over others, what makes them so deadly, and how today’s bioengineers are trying to stop them… if such a thing is even possible.

(via pbsdigitalstudios)

The celebrity chef and master marketer reveals how he cultivates his brand.
In the three decades since Wolfgang Puck opened Spago in West Hollywood, the groundbreaking gourmet has parlayed his food-world stardom into one successful venture after another: packaged foods in grocery stores, a burgeoning line of kitchen appliances, and more than 100 fine dining and express restaurants in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. Quality food, it turns out, is only part of Puck’s recipe for building an epicurean empire. Here he reveals the ingredients he has used to spice up his career.
Read More>

The celebrity chef and master marketer reveals how he cultivates his brand.

In the three decades since Wolfgang Puck opened Spago in West Hollywood, the groundbreaking gourmet has parlayed his food-world stardom into one successful venture after another: packaged foods in grocery stores, a burgeoning line of kitchen appliances, and more than 100 fine dining and express restaurants in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. Quality food, it turns out, is only part of Puck’s recipe for building an epicurean empire. Here he reveals the ingredients he has used to spice up his career.

Read More>

Meetings want to suck. Wrest control of them with this seven-step strategy.
You know when a meeting turns into a complete waste of time? Maybe you’re trying to come up with ideas, or make a decision. Before anyone realizes it, the meeting starts to suck.
Meetings want to suck. Two of their favorite suckiness tactics are group brainstorming and group negotiation. Give them half a chance, and they’ll waste your time, sap your energy, and leave you with poor ideas and a watered-down decision. But meetings don’t have to be that way.
On the Google Ventures design team, we dislike sucky meetings as much as anyone. We use a process hack that short-circuits the worst parts of groupthink while getting the most out of different perspectives. For lack of a better name, we call it the “note-and-vote.”
The next time you need to make a decision or come up with a new idea in a group, call timeout and give the note-and-vote a try.
How It Works>

Meetings want to suck. Wrest control of them with this seven-step strategy.

You know when a meeting turns into a complete waste of time? Maybe you’re trying to come up with ideas, or make a decision. Before anyone realizes it, the meeting starts to suck.

Meetings want to suck. Two of their favorite suckiness tactics are group brainstorming and group negotiation. Give them half a chance, and they’ll waste your time, sap your energy, and leave you with poor ideas and a watered-down decision. But meetings don’t have to be that way.

On the Google Ventures design team, we dislike sucky meetings as much as anyone. We use a process hack that short-circuits the worst parts of groupthink while getting the most out of different perspectives. For lack of a better name, we call it the “note-and-vote.”

The next time you need to make a decision or come up with a new idea in a group, call timeout and give the note-and-vote a try.

How It Works>