FastCompany Magazine

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Nearly 90 of jobs demand social media skills, but it turns out just hiring Millennials isn’t the answer.
In all the talk about the tech about the mismatch between the projected number of STEM jobs (1.2 million new ones in the next six years) and the U.S.-based talent to fill those positions, we’re losing sight of another big skills gap that’s right under our fingers every day.
Ninety percent of all jobs in the next year will require information and communication technology skills, according to research by Capgemini. Yet more than half the companies polled lacked social media skills. That’s despite a McKinsey report that projects social media adding up to $1.3 trillion to our economy. No wonder the gap is poised to create a war for talent that quietly rivals the battle playing out amid the startups of Silicon Valley.
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Nearly 90 of jobs demand social media skills, but it turns out just hiring Millennials isn’t the answer.

In all the talk about the tech about the mismatch between the projected number of STEM jobs (1.2 million new ones in the next six years) and the U.S.-based talent to fill those positions, we’re losing sight of another big skills gap that’s right under our fingers every day.

Ninety percent of all jobs in the next year will require information and communication technology skills, according to research by Capgemini. Yet more than half the companies polled lacked social media skills. That’s despite a McKinsey report that projects social media adding up to $1.3 trillion to our economy. No wonder the gap is poised to create a war for talent that quietly rivals the battle playing out amid the startups of Silicon Valley.

Read More>

npr:

We’ve looked a lot at privacy from the Big Brother standpoint: how the National Security Agency or corporate giants like Google track us online — say for political reasons or to make money from ads.
But there’s another kind of privacy concern that is a lot more intimate. You could call it Little Brother. Though it’s really more like husbands and wives, lovers and exes who secretly watch their partner — from a distance. They are cyberstalking — using digital tools that are a lot cheaper than hiring a private detective.

NPR investigated these tools, also known as spyware, and spoke with domestic violence counselors and survivors around the country. We found that cyberstalking is now a standard part of domestic abuse in the U.S.

Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims
Photo credit: Aarti Shahani/NPR.

npr:

We’ve looked a lot at privacy from the Big Brother standpoint: how the National Security Agency or corporate giants like Google track us online — say for political reasons or to make money from ads.

But there’s another kind of privacy concern that is a lot more intimate. You could call it Little Brother. Though it’s really more like husbands and wives, lovers and exes who secretly watch their partner — from a distance. They are cyberstalking — using digital tools that are a lot cheaper than hiring a private detective.

NPR investigated these tools, also known as spyware, and spoke with domestic violence counselors and survivors around the country. We found that cyberstalking is now a standard part of domestic abuse in the U.S.

Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims

Photo credit: Aarti Shahani/NPR.

While her character GoldieBlox engineers fantastical creations, Debbie Starling engineered a successful company, with the help of her market vision and rapid prototyping skills. (A little controversy with the Beastie Boys didn’t hurt either).
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While her character GoldieBlox engineers fantastical creations, Debbie Starling engineered a successful company, with the help of her market vision and rapid prototyping skills. (A little controversy with the Beastie Boys didn’t hurt either).

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S.H.E. Global Media founder Claudia Chan working to change the conversation from celebrity gossip to women’s empowerment.
Claudia Chan wants to be the Richard Branson of women’s empowerment—by championing social entrepreneurship to solve global problems. “I believe it needs to be its own industry,” she says.
And she’s taking steps to make that happen. Chan has created a media network S.H.E. Global Media Inc. She’s launched an annual women’s empowerment conference, and is working on a new project S.H.E. University that will offer classes and training to women online.
Chan has been focusing her business efforts on women since founding Shecky’s, a “girls’ night out” events company since the early 2000s. But it wasn’t until 2010 that she started to feel something was missing. She says her career lacked purpose and it seemed everywhere she turned, women’s media was consumed with stories about beauty, fashion, celebrities, and how to have a perfect body. At events for entrepreneurs, men always filled up the room.

At the same time, Chan started hearing more and more about women’s issues—from poverty plaguing women in the developing world to the massive underrepresentation of women leaders at Fortune 500 companies. Why weren’t more women talking about these issues?
What if Chan could use her girls’ night out rallying skills to get women in their twenties and thirties together around issues most important to them? “How do we get women to obsess about women’s empowerment the same way they do about the Kardashians and Us Weekly?” she asked.
Chan started interviewing women leaders, and has since amassed more than 200 interviews on her website. In June 2014, she ran the third annual S.H.E. Summit, which brought together inspiring women leaders like Musimbi Kanyoro, president and CEO of the Global Fund For Women and race car driver Simona de Silvestro. “I kept meeting extraordinary women and their stories weren’t being told,” says Chan. “We can’t be what we can’t see.”
Over the years working with women, Chan has learned to take a few key steps to help spread the message of women’s empowerment more successfully.
Read More>

S.H.E. Global Media founder Claudia Chan working to change the conversation from celebrity gossip to women’s empowerment.

Claudia Chan wants to be the Richard Branson of women’s empowerment—by championing social entrepreneurship to solve global problems. “I believe it needs to be its own industry,” she says.

And she’s taking steps to make that happen. Chan has created a media network S.H.E. Global Media Inc. She’s launched an annual women’s empowerment conference, and is working on a new project S.H.E. University that will offer classes and training to women online.

Chan has been focusing her business efforts on women since founding Shecky’s, a “girls’ night out” events company since the early 2000s. But it wasn’t until 2010 that she started to feel something was missing. She says her career lacked purpose and it seemed everywhere she turned, women’s media was consumed with stories about beauty, fashion, celebrities, and how to have a perfect body. At events for entrepreneurs, men always filled up the room.

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At the same time, Chan started hearing more and more about women’s issues—from poverty plaguing women in the developing world to the massive underrepresentation of women leaders at Fortune 500 companies. Why weren’t more women talking about these issues?

What if Chan could use her girls’ night out rallying skills to get women in their twenties and thirties together around issues most important to them? “How do we get women to obsess about women’s empowerment the same way they do about the Kardashians and Us Weekly?” she asked.

Chan started interviewing women leaders, and has since amassed more than 200 interviews on her website. In June 2014, she ran the third annual S.H.E. Summit, which brought together inspiring women leaders like Musimbi Kanyoro, president and CEO of the Global Fund For Women and race car driver Simona de Silvestro. “I kept meeting extraordinary women and their stories weren’t being told,” says Chan. “We can’t be what we can’t see.”

Over the years working with women, Chan has learned to take a few key steps to help spread the message of women’s empowerment more successfully.

Read More>

Going into its 45th season, Sesame Street gives us a glimpse of its future. Plus, clips from our favorite historic episodes.
If you are under the age of 50, there’s a good chance you are fiercely attached to Sesame Street, the show that shepherded so many of us through our toddler years.
You may remember sitting in rapt attention, wondering if anybody would believe that Mr. Snuffleupagus was real, or giggling hysterically about Oscar the Grouch’s musical ode to trash. For generations of viewers, Sesame Street is a portal to a simpler, more innocent time in their lives. This creates something of a quandary for the show’s producers: how do you keep evolving a show so it doesn’t get stale without offending its devoted fans?
Read More>

Going into its 45th season, Sesame Street gives us a glimpse of its future. Plus, clips from our favorite historic episodes.

If you are under the age of 50, there’s a good chance you are fiercely attached to Sesame Street, the show that shepherded so many of us through our toddler years.

You may remember sitting in rapt attention, wondering if anybody would believe that Mr. Snuffleupagus was real, or giggling hysterically about Oscar the Grouch’s musical ode to trash. For generations of viewers, Sesame Street is a portal to a simpler, more innocent time in their lives. This creates something of a quandary for the show’s producers: how do you keep evolving a show so it doesn’t get stale without offending its devoted fans?

Read More>

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.
A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.
“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”
In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.
“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”
DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:
Read More>

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.

A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.

“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”

In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.

“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”

DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:

Read More>