FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

For all our talk about flex time and the freedom (and insanity) the Internet gives us to work at any time of the day, the traditional 9 to 5 workday, with a break at noon, is still going pretty strong.
Read More>

For all our talk about flex time and the freedom (and insanity) the Internet gives us to work at any time of the day, the traditional 9 to 5 workday, with a break at noon, is still going pretty strong.

Read More>

Ricky Gervais is a Netflix superfan, Matthew Dear makes machine music with GE, a Bissell brand manager eats off the subway floor, anti-litter ads made from garbage, and cats running a Pizza Hut.
Watch>

Ricky Gervais is a Netflix superfan, Matthew Dear makes machine music with GE, a Bissell brand manager eats off the subway floor, anti-litter ads made from garbage, and cats running a Pizza Hut.

Watch>

Box SVP Sam Schillace shares how he quickly and cheaply experimented on an app no one wanted—that became the basis for Google Docs.

Schillace says that even at companies focused on innovation, it’s hard to convince others of the value of truly new things. “Whenever you see something that’s truly creative or disruptive, it challenges your worldview. And when you’re challenged like that, you have a choice either to accept the challenge, meaning that you are in some way wrong, or reject it, which is saying that the thing itself is wrong. So it’s very rare that people will say, ‘Oh I must be stupid because I didn’t see this,’ so usually people’s first reaction is to reject them.”

Read More>

Box SVP Sam Schillace shares how he quickly and cheaply experimented on an app no one wanted—that became the basis for Google Docs.

Schillace says that even at companies focused on innovation, it’s hard to convince others of the value of truly new things. “Whenever you see something that’s truly creative or disruptive, it challenges your worldview. And when you’re challenged like that, you have a choice either to accept the challenge, meaning that you are in some way wrong, or reject it, which is saying that the thing itself is wrong. So it’s very rare that people will say, ‘Oh I must be stupid because I didn’t see this,’ so usually people’s first reaction is to reject them.”

Read More>

Tweaking the UX of our social media tools could help readers better understand fast-moving news.
The Boston Marathon bombings. Tornadoes in the Midwest. Now, tragically, Ferguson. When serious breaking news happens, many of us turn to social media—especially Twitter—to keep up and get the most detailed information we can as quickly as possible. But the events in Missouri these last few weeks made me think about the deficiencies of our current information tools, and how we might improve the social, breaking news experience.
Read More>

Tweaking the UX of our social media tools could help readers better understand fast-moving news.

The Boston Marathon bombings. Tornadoes in the Midwest. Now, tragically, Ferguson. When serious breaking news happens, many of us turn to social media—especially Twitter—to keep up and get the most detailed information we can as quickly as possible. But the events in Missouri these last few weeks made me think about the deficiencies of our current information tools, and how we might improve the social, breaking news experience.

Read More>

Turn email into less of a chore with templates of responses and save hours every week.
In an age where the workday is seemingly getting longer and longer, every minute counts. So we thought we’d give you some of them back with this week’s productivity hack.
Read More>

Turn email into less of a chore with templates of responses and save hours every week.

In an age where the workday is seemingly getting longer and longer, every minute counts. So we thought we’d give you some of them back with this week’s productivity hack.

Read More>

If you’re like most Americans, you suffer from the physical, emotional, and mental epidemic that the scientific community calls “sitting disease.”
But unlike many other illnesses that require a team of doctors, the cure is in our own hands—or feet, rather—and all we have to do is take a walk.
Last week we challenged readers, and ourselves, to restore some energy, focus, and creativity by taking either a 20-minute lunchtime walk or two 15-minute mid-morning and mid-afternoon walks each day.
Here’s what happened when we put this advice to the test.

If you’re like most Americans, you suffer from the physical, emotional, and mental epidemic that the scientific community calls “sitting disease.”

But unlike many other illnesses that require a team of doctors, the cure is in our own hands—or feet, rather—and all we have to do is take a walk.

Last week we challenged readers, and ourselves, to restore some energy, focus, and creativity by taking either a 20-minute lunchtime walk or two 15-minute mid-morning and mid-afternoon walks each day.

Here’s what happened when we put this advice to the test.