FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

These creative thinkers prove that if you can dream it, you can probably make a living out of it.
Having a dream job means different things to different people.
It could be the job you’ve been working towards throughout your career—something you’ll hopefully reach in the future. It could be a fantasy of a life that’s completely different from your current job, doing something extraordinary. Or it could be turning something you love to do into a job and making a living out of it.
If you’re searching for inspiration for that fantasy life with an extraordinarily cool job, here are some passions we never thought of turning into a job:
Read More>

These creative thinkers prove that if you can dream it, you can probably make a living out of it.

Having a dream job means different things to different people.

It could be the job you’ve been working towards throughout your career—something you’ll hopefully reach in the future. It could be a fantasy of a life that’s completely different from your current job, doing something extraordinary. Or it could be turning something you love to do into a job and making a living out of it.

If you’re searching for inspiration for that fantasy life with an extraordinarily cool job, here are some passions we never thought of turning into a job:

Read More>

New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete.
At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when.
Read More>

New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete.

At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when.

Read More>

First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?
Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.
It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)
Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.
Let us count the ways this is absurd.
Read More>

First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?

Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.

It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)

Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.

Let us count the ways this is absurd.

Read More>

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.
To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.

To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>